backtop


Print 68 comment(s) - last by dailyjohn.. on Nov 24 at 7:18 PM

I hate my ISP a lot more today

Google announced back in 2010 it was seeking communities to participate in an experiment involving insanely fast fiber-optic broadband. The plan was called Google Fiber and ultimately Kansas City was chosen. The first homes and businesses with Google Fiber had their 1 Gbps service turned on yesterday.

However, anytime we see internet providers offer theoretical peak speeds, we usually take them with a huge grain of salt. However, it looks like Google Fiber is actually incredibly fast in the real world.
 
A Google Fiber user named Mike Demarais ran a speed test only minutes after his service went live according to ArsTechnica. He achieved 696.38 Mbps download and an impressive 620.49 Mbps upload.

"The first thing I did was BitTorrent Ubuntu," Demarais said. "I think that took two minutes, let me try it again right now."

The home where Demarais accesses these incredibly fast internet speeds is operated by Homes for Hackers, and is owned by Ben Barreth. Entrepreneurs can live in the house rent and utility free for three months at a time, only needing to pay for their own groceries.
 
Homes for Hackers is billed as an attempt to kick start high-tech businesses within the city.

Google offers a few different plans for customers. For $120/month you get Gigabit internet (up/down), HDTV service, a Nexus 7 tablet, and 1 TV box. If all you need is gigabit internet, that will only run you $70/month. Google is even offering a "free" internet service (guaranteed for at least 7 years) that provides 5Mb down/1Mb up. However, customers have to pay the $300 "construction fee" that is waived on the two paid packages.
 
There are no data caps on any of Google's packages (including the "free" one).

Source: ArsTechnica



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Google
By Argon18 on 11/14/2012 12:49:37 PM , Rating: 5
Fast internet is a great thing, but the "who" in this case is terrifying to me. Who being Google. This internet is "free" in the same way that Gmail and the other Google consumer services are "free".

They are zero dollar cost to the consumer, but you have to literally sign away all your rights and freedoms, while simultaneously granting them unlimited access to all your data now and forever. Make no mistake, this "free" Google internet will have terms of service that allow them to track and monitor your every online move , archiving Terabytes of data about you. Not anonymous data either, but data that is tied to you personally.

Imagine your local police department being able to ask for a search warrant, and without ever entering your home, they can get your entire life's history of internet usage. Every email you've sent and received, every web page you've read, every file you've downloaded -- absolutely everything, all neatly packaged up and handed to them by Google.

Know what's even more scary? Current US laws allow for police to request ALL electronic communications to/from you that are older than 6 months, without a warrant!

Scary stuff for anyone who values their privacy.




RE: Google
By Argon18 on 11/14/2012 12:52:13 PM , Rating: 2
And sure, they can request such things from your current "traditional" ISP right now, but most ISP's today like phone and cable companies don't have the means to archive Petabytes of data, and the clever software tools to tie it all together and track it with massive databases. Most ISP's today are just a pipe, with only rudimentary IP logging. Google is a very different animal....


RE: Google
By NellyFromMA on 11/14/2012 2:09:34 PM , Rating: 3
You're going to by lynched for suggesting this up here, so I applaud your bringing it up even more so.

Yes ISPs can and do log at least this level of information, and scarily have been federally protected from privacy suits for what feels like over a decade, but they cannot use that information for marketing nor sell it to others, only national security.

What other companies, most notably Google, did in noticing this was decided they too would start amassing that information, except they were going to use it for commercial ad profits.

Google search definitely brought the internet a few steps forward similar to how Microsoft did the same with Windows coming from DOS.

I'm not much in favor of their overall business practices in the passed 5 years nor am I thrilled with society cumulative shrug off of their right to privacy.

It's alarming something so valuable and entrenched in many of the aspects of our constitution's founding are dismissed by so many today.


RE: Google
By jRaskell on 11/14/2012 1:17:51 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Make no mistake, this "free" Google internet will have terms of service that allow them to track and monitor your every online move


And you have access to these terms of service that clearly sign away all your rights and freedoms? If so, by all means post them for everyone else to see.


RE: Google
By NellyFromMA on 11/14/2012 1:59:03 PM , Rating: 3
You may not have heard, but Google profits from EVERY SERVICE IT PROVIDES with effectively the same usage model: gather broad usage information per user, associate info with gmail or other google acct, attempt to funnel you into different market demographics, then leverage Google Ads to the max.

So, obviously the will be similar. Not one of Google's ventures operates otherwise. Part of being a public company driven off of the ads only business model I'm afraid.

No need to nay say, its just common sense deduction based on the reality of how they operate today.


RE: Google
By glenco on 11/15/2012 1:00:14 AM , Rating: 3
this IS Google we are talking about, maybe you haven't heard of them. of course they are in it for the data.


RE: Google
By Ammohunt on 11/14/2012 2:09:42 PM , Rating: 2
if you are that paranoid buy a server hosted on the internet and setup a point to point ipsec tunnel and browse from the hosted server network. Even google can't snoop an encrypted tunnel.


RE: Google
By vectorm12 on 11/14/2012 2:55:24 PM , Rating: 2
Just use TOR and get over it if you're that paranoid about corporations and the Gov spying on you.

If I was hooked up to Google Fibre the first thing I'd do would be to setup a tor-bridge.


RE: Google
By bsd228 on 11/14/2012 2:56:50 PM , Rating: 2
> They are zero dollar cost to the consumer, but you have to literally sign away all your rights and freedoms, while simultaneously granting them unlimited access to all your data now and forever. Make no mistake, this "free" Google internet will have terms of service that allow them to track and monitor your every online move , archiving Terabytes of data about you. Not anonymous data either, but data that is tied to you personally.

Welcome to 2001! Yahoo teamed up with the Bells to offer $15 DSL service in a time when it was generally 30-40 and up. But...they data mined your activity.


RE: Google
By Captain Orgazmo on 11/14/2012 3:44:39 PM , Rating: 2
Paranoid a bit? I don't doubt that Google is profiting at least in some way by offering free internet service, but why else would they offer it? And to say that you would have to
quote:
literally sign away all your rights and freedoms, while simultaneously granting them unlimited access to all your data now and forever
is such insane hyperbole, it needs no counter argument.

You don't have to sign anything, just don't use their service. If you are afraid of being monitored, worry about reasons other than profit. The NSA is already hooked into all the internet backbones, and there is no guarantee that tyranny will never come to the west, so if you think you are at risk using Google, you should be just as diligent with your current service.


RE: Google
By inperfectdarkness on 11/15/2012 2:17:41 AM , Rating: 2
good luck! at 700Mbps, i'm also behind 7 proxies. ;)


“So far we have not seen a single Android device that does not infringe on our patents." -- Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki