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Print 48 comment(s) - last by YashBudini.. on Nov 11 at 2:12 PM


  (Source: F30Post)
They're due out in 2013 and 2014

BMW is due to release a slew of new turbo diesel engines in the United States throughout 2013 and 2014. 

Among those in the diesel lineup is the F30 3 Series sedan diesel, due out in the first half of 2013; the F31 3 Series touring, due out in the second half of 2013; the F10 5 Series diesel, due out in the third quarter of 2013; the X5d diesel, due out at the end of 2013; the 7 Series diesel, due in the first half of 2014, and the X3d diesel, due in the first half of 2014. 

According to F30Post, a 180 HP 4-cylinder engine may be assigned to 20d or 25d models while a 255 HP 6-cylinder engine may be assigned to 28d, 30d or 35d models. However, no official announcements have been made in that regard. 

The U.S. had some other exciting diesel-related announcements this year as well, such as Porsche's first diesel model for the U.S. (the 2013 Cayenne Diesel), and Mazda said it was bringing a diesel engine to the U.S. by 2014

Source: F30post



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Diesel is great
By rebound11 on 11/7/2012 10:25:55 AM , Rating: 2
I live in Europe and I have an 11 year old diesel car (1.8l engine... small by American standards, but quite big nowadays around Europe). The tank is 45 liters and I can squeeze on average 1000km out of it. That's more than my cousins petrol car (same 1.8 liter engine, same car actually on the outside, different propulsion, and his is 1 year newer). The horse power is slightly better on his car 130 vs my 115, but the torque is almost double on mine than on his (~300Nm vs little over 150Nm). He can't go more than 800 km on a full tank even if his tank is 55 liters. The price of diesel is about 20% higher here than that of petrol, which still leaves my car with a margin over his. But on another note I get my full torque at 2000 rpm and full power at 4000 rpm while he has to take it up to 2700 rpm for full torque and 5500 for full power.

I have never had any issues with mine and I drive it like a race car (even took it up to 215km/h, what else do you need?)... just regular checks and following instructions (oil+filter changes @ every 10-15k kilometers, distribution changed at every 80k km, air and A/C filter changed at every 50k km and intend to change the clutch when I reach 200k km; only hanged the glowplugs and the battery once so far @125k km).

Someone pointed out the -20 degrees C issue... as long as you warm up the glow plugs twice, turn off all electronics before start-up and use the right mix of diesel and additives it will work in those conditions as well. I almost blew my fuel pump at -22 this winter because the smart-asses at the gas-station mixed water in the diesel so they can make a quick buck. Also cars that are sold in Nordic countries have by default what some call a "nordic-kit" which includes tougher suspensions, extra shielding from ice that can be thrown by the wheels into the radiator or other parts of the car and installations that pre-heat the oil, and ready the fuel pump for a very cold start.

The only problem with diesel is that it sounds like a tractor when the engine is cold, but I give it at least 500k km lifetime, 1000k if treated correctly. To be honest, I would only like an electric car more than a diesel, and that's because of the quietness, ease of driving and instant torque.




RE: Diesel is great
By boeush on 11/7/2012 6:17:08 PM , Rating: 2
Something that's not so great: breathing the foul-smelling, carcinogenic and asthma-inducing diesel exhaust. Yeah, I've heard all about the "clean" diesels, but even they don't clean their exhaust with 100% efficiency. Maybe driving a diesel isn't so bad, but being stuck in traffic behind a diesel (with its exhaust pipe right in front of your car's cabin air intakes) isn't quite so pleasant, at all. And in high-density/high-traffic places where you might find yourself routinely stuck for large fractions of an hour in heavy traffic congestion on a 5-lane freeway (such as frequently happens in California, for instance), just the mere thought of thousands of these "clean" diesel cars idling bumper-to-bumper, combining their emissions together into a nice little cloud over the road, makes my skin crawl. I'd pity anyone whose home would be within a mile of any major road, if diesel cars became the norm in such high-traffic, high-density locales.


RE: Diesel is great
By freedom4556 on 11/7/2012 8:36:47 PM , Rating: 2
CARB and the EPA would rather you crawl in that same jam in an EV beeping away at an annoying volume to warn other pedestrians such as children and cyclists that your coming. (Like there's tons of those on a 5-lane interstate) How insanity inducing would that racket be?


RE: Diesel is great
By rebound11 on 11/8/2012 2:45:46 AM , Rating: 2
I have no clue what you're talking about... I have my car tested every year and although it's Euro 3 it can easily fit the Euro 4 emissions norm. Hell I can make it Euro 5 if I add a filter (that's a bit too expensive to be worth it). Here's some reading:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_emission_sta...

I have no idea what crap diesels you drive back there, but the exhausts of diesels in Europe cannot be "in front of any car's intake" because they're pointed downwards... that's how you can tell a diesel from a petrol car at a distance. Here:
Diesel http://goo.gl/rvYwb
Petrol http://goo.gl/9hbxM


RE: Diesel is great
By silverblue on 11/8/2012 9:40:02 AM , Rating: 2
My Peugeot 206 HDi's original exhaust was as you showed, however when the back box rotted away, I had it replaced and the exhaust was lozenge shaped (Walker - I wanted Bosal but none were available). Conversely, my other half's 206 1.1 petrol has a downward-pointing exhaust.


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