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Hyundai Elantra

Revised Numbers from Hyundai  (Source: Hyundai)
Millions to be paid out to owners over misleading claims

Back in December of 2011, Consumer Watchdog called on the EPA to investigate Hyundai over its fuel economy claims. According to Consumer Watchdog, Hyundai claimed that its Elantra was good for 29 mpg in the city and 40 mpg on highway. The problem the organization had with the claims is that it received a higher than usual number of complaints that real-world mileage was in the mid-20 mpg range.

The EPA did investigate Hyundai for misleading mileage claims as well as Kia, and changes in fuel economy estimates are coming as a result of the investigation. Both Kia and Hyundai will be lowering the fuel economy estimates on the majority of their 2012 to 2013 models after EPA testing discovered discrepancies between its data and the company's data.

Hyundai and Kia admitted to overstating the estimated fuel economy on window stickers of about 900,000 vehicles sold since late 2010. The two automakers will reportedly spend millions of dollars to compensate owners for faulty claims of economy.

Hyundai will also have to retract its widely used claim that it leads the industry with four vehicle models able to get 40 mpg on the highway. That statement will be retracted because estimated highway economy on the 2013 Accent, Veloster, and Elantra are being reduced to below 40 mpg.
 
Some of the biggest losers include the Hyundai Accent and the all-new, redesigned 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe. The Accent saw its 30/40/33 (city/highway/combined) rating drop to 28/37/31. The Santa Fe Sport (2WD) saw a huge drop in its highway rating, going from 21/31/25 (city/highway/combined) to 20/27/23.
 
Many of the mileage adjustments take Hyundai models from being class leaders to either middle-of-the-pack or lower.

On the Kia side of things, the Soul took the biggest hit as it saw its highway numbers drop by 6 mpg (35 mpg highway to 29 mpg highway).
 
Overstating fuel efficiency is a significant blunder by the two car companies because gas prices are up, and many people are shopping based on fuel economy claims by the manufacturer. The EPA notes that window sticker values have previously been reduced on only two vehicles sense 2000, so that makes Hyundai’s folly even more egregious.

"Given the importance of fuel efficiency to all of us, we're extremely sorry about these errors," said Hyundai Motor America President and CEO John Krafcik. "We're going to make this right."

Krafcik blamed the inaccurate fuel efficiency claims on "procedural errors" in the fuel-economy testing methodology the company used. Hyundai-Kia's combined fleetwide fuel economy average declined from 27 MPG to 26 mpg for the 2012 model year working out to about a 3% reduction.

Krafcik added, "We've identified the source of the discrepancies between our prior testing method and the EPA's recommended approach."

Sources: Detroit News, Hyundai, Kia



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RE: Surely not?!
By CharonPDX on 11/2/2012 10:15:38 AM , Rating: 3
I had a '99 Hyundai that I got a (small, like $50) class-action settlement out of because they overstated the horsepower!


RE: Surely not?!
By Samus on 11/2/2012 11:06:27 AM , Rating: 1
I remember that, the Tiburon right? The ridiculous thing about HP ratings is that there are so many different conditions that affect performance (altitude, weather, fuel quality, temperature)

So unless all manufactures tested their vehicles on a cool, humid night at sea level in the Midwestern Spring with benchmark fuel, and the owner did the SAME thing, the performance could widely vary.

And since we are talking about something mechanical that has mass wear and tear, any future drag caused by accessories, increase in temperature caused by an inefficient cooling system, and any carbon built up or dirt/oil covering a sensor (like the MAF or IAT) will also affect performance widely, and it doesn't even take a year for things like this to occure in a daily driven vehicle.

MPG is another story...I've been wondering (without researching because I really don't care) how these Korean cars have been getting such high MPG ratings.


RE: Surely not?!
By sprockkets on 11/2/2012 11:37:26 AM , Rating: 2
There are, but still in general you should get something around the stated numbers. People noticed that with the RX-8 of BHP vs. stated (or crankshaft HP). Even with the expected loses it wasn't close to what it should be.

Turns out the US version has less HP due to emissions requirements, so Mazda went as far to allow people to return their RX-8 if they wanted to.


RE: Surely not?!
By bill.rookard on 11/2/2012 2:48:50 PM , Rating: 2
They had a similar issue over at Ford for the 99 Mustang Cobras - they did the right thing though by recalling it and making some changes to the intake manifold ('messy' castings), exhaust, and tune.

Of course, with a limited production of a few thousand units that's far more do-able than recalling several hundred thousand vehicles.


RE: Surely not?!
By theapparition on 11/5/2012 11:24:03 AM , Rating: 2
And repeated for the 2001-2002 Cobras, for which they never did make amends......unless you consider that they fixed the issue by adding a supercharger to the 2003-2004 "Terminator" models.

But people with the 01/02 models got screwed twice. Once because the car didn't meet it's hp goals, and again by their ridiculous depreciation. No one wants them when the 2003/2004 models were so much better.


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