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Print 20 comment(s) - last by Moishe.. on Nov 2 at 2:07 PM

AMD anyone?

Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) announced on Monday that it would be releasing new 64-bit Opterons in 2014 leveraging a radically different architecture to its current complex instruction set computer (CISC) x86 architecture -- ARM Holdings plc's (LON:ARM) reduced instruction set computer (RISC) ARM architecture.

At the tiime AMD mentioned in passing that the chips were 64-bit.  That led to a bit of mystery, as ARM had not officially announced a 64-bit intellectual property core yet, although one was widely rumored.

That mystery was laid to rest yesterday when ARM Holdings announced a new intellectual property core -- the Cortex-A50 -- a core which leverage ARM's previously announced ARMv8 64-bit instruction set extensions.

The chips will tackle the full range of applications -- everything from smartphones to servers.  It is the linear successor to the 32-bit ARM Cortex-A15.

ARM Holdings has announced several Cortex-A50 cores geared at different objectives. The ARM Cortex-A53 will be the most power-efficent ARM processor, and the world's "smallest" (according to ARM) 64-bit processor.  ARM pledges that the mobile-geared Cortex-A53 will offer "three times the performance" of current generation smartphone chips.

A second core, the ARM Cortex-A57, is a more powerful 64-bit core, aimed at "high-performance applications", such as heavily threaded server workloads.

Calxeda dense server
Server chip makers Calxeda (pictured) are among Cortex-A50's early adopters.

Wonder who is cooking up 64-bit ARM cores?  ARM disclosed that its initial licensee list indeed includes AMD.  Also on the list are Broadcom Corp. (BRCM)  Calxeda (Hewlett-Packard Comp.'s (HPQ) server chip partner, actually an ARM Holdings startup subsidiary), HiSilicon Technologies Comp., Ltd., Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. (KSC:005930), and STMicroelectronics N.V. (EPA:STM).

ARM says the new cores should ship in 2014.  The ARMv8 instruction set, though, is currently available for advanced developers and device implementers to start tinkering with.  Usually there's about a half year of lag time between the IP core announcement and the time when official speed and core count targets begin to trickle out from licensees: so chip buffs, stay tuned.

Source: ARM



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RE: .
By inperfectdarkness on 11/1/2012 2:37:04 AM , Rating: 1
get back to me when crysis can be played in wqxga on a tablet. i swear by a 15" laptop--not because it's the fastest or most powerful pc, but because 15" has always been (imho) the perfect balance between power and portability. i spend a LOT of my time "away from home". i'm also a religious gamer (that's gaming religiously, not someone who plays religious games).

now i've got nothing against half-life 1, but if that's the most "modern" game that a tablet can handle, then it sure as sh** isn't going to cut it for me.

i will always feel my computing needs are adequately met between a laptop & a smartphone (if i choose to get a smartphone). i can derive little additional benefit from procuring a tablet, nor can a tablet offer nearly enough functionality to sway me away from a dedicated laptop.

i've said the same thing about owing a wii/laptop & not buying a ps3/360. sure there's a market BETWEEN the two, but for someone who owns both ends, there's virtually no additional benefit.


RE: .
By Moishe on 11/2/2012 2:07:51 PM , Rating: 2
Agreed. People don't understand that there are multiple markets, and they vary in size. Tablets will always sell more than PCs because they are cheaper and more portable and take care of the basic needs.

But good luck doing intensive things on tablets.

I use mine as a DVR, gaming machine (BF3), development, video processing, etc. Those won't be taken by tablets anytime soon. At best development, video processing, and low end gaming can be done on tablets. I think the video processing will always be slower.


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