backtop


Print 63 comment(s) - last by BrotherPointy.. on Oct 31 at 4:27 PM


  (Source: engadget.com)
There are only 1,000 spots available in the current registry

Valve has announced that it is allowing users to apply for the Steam for Linux beta.
 
Valve is specifically looking for experienced users that are familiar with Linux and are running Ubuntu 12.04 or above. This is likely because it's in the way early stages and needs a good debugging. Users that are newer to Linux are being asked to wait until the next beta release to apply. 
 
There are only 1,000 spots available in the current registry, so those who fit the bill can sign up through their Steam accounts. Valve will follow up with users afterward. 
 
Steam is a digital distribution, multiplayer and communications platform that distributes video games online from small developers to larger software companies. 

Source: Joystiq



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

The biggest barrier to widespread Linux Adoption...
By borismkv on 10/29/2012 3:05:50 PM , Rating: 4
Has always been people who use Linux.




By The Raven on 10/29/2012 4:26:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The biggest barrier to widespread Linux Adoption...Has always been people who use Linux.

The biggest barrier to widespread Linux Adoption...is douchbags comments like this.

What interest in this do you have and yet you go out of your way to trash the free tools that have been opened for your free use? And besides...have you never heard of Android? That is pretty widespread in anyone's estimation. (Also in countless devices such as DVD/BD players, Roku, etc.)

I understand why people hate on Apple and MS: they poison the well with misleading ads and dubious patents, etc.
But why do people hate on the open source community? I've never met nicer people. Yes some have less than desirable people skills, but they know their S. Unlike the guy in Bangalore or the kid at the "imbecile" bar.


By spread on 10/29/2012 5:52:28 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
But why do people hate on the open source community? I've never met nicer people. Yes some have less than desirable people skills, but they know their S. Unlike the guy in Bangalore or the kid at the "imbecile" bar.


Because they make stupid decisions. Yes, we understand it's your OS and you get to have your way but don't complain when nobody uses it because it's too complicated and the UI is bad.

Linux needs more polish. It's a joke. These people need to involve some artists and some designers with common sense into their projects.


By Ammohunt on 10/29/2012 6:03:18 PM , Rating: 2
Not sure what distro you are using but the Gnome GUI interface Fedora Core provides is excellent and in my opinion much better than Microsoft latest attempt at one.


By borismkv on 10/29/2012 6:26:45 PM , Rating: 1
Thanks for proving my point. Every FOSS solution I've run across has been a pile of crap with terrible documentation because the FOSS community can't be bothered with things like usability and technical writing. If you try to get help with things in the support community, there are 15 condescending douchebags for every 1 helpful person.


By Nortel on 10/29/2012 4:47:48 PM , Rating: 2
From as far as I can tell, OSX is used by a lot of people. Ubuntu is just the poor mans OSX.


By Motoman on 10/29/2012 8:10:26 PM , Rating: 2
Not really. Apple is ~5% of the worldwide computer market. Statistically insignificant.

...Linux is even more insignificant.


By Bubbacub on 10/30/2012 4:03:13 AM , Rating: 2
dude - seriously. thats like saying that windows phone 8 is a poor mans version of windows server because they both run on the NT kernal. they are different operating systems that do different things.

ubuntu has got nothing to do with osx - they are completely different paradigms running on different kernals.


By Bateluer on 10/30/2012 7:33:28 PM , Rating: 2
I would tend to agree. One of the biggest issues with Linux is the persistence of the command line for things that should be entirely through the GUI. Like driver installation, for example. Installing video card drivers, an important task that needs to happen regularly on a enthusiasts desktop, is a royal pain to do the first time. To say nothing of updating them in a few months with an updated version is released. The BASH command line is still around because to many linux devs have a love affair, hipster like attitude towards it. They don't want it to go away. By proxy, you could make the argument that the linux devs do not want their OS to become a mainstream desktop OS.

I find the UIs in most major distros perfectly fine, though there can be a learning curve if you've been using Windows or OSX for a long time. Its my opinion though, that even the newest version of GNOME is better than W8/WP8, formerly Metro, UI.


By BrotherPointy on 10/31/2012 8:54:31 AM , Rating: 2
Bro... In modern Ubuntu drivers are a one-click install from a dialog that pops up automatically when Ubuntu detects there are proprietary drivers you could use. No command line. They get updated automatically when an update is out.

I see a lot of comments here by people who have evidently not tried Linux, or at least not a good distro in recent times (ie. this year). Remember Linux distros put out new versions twice a year, not every few years like Windows.

Devs love the CLI because to *them* it really is useful. I agree about it being a hipster attitude in the general community though, often suggesting the CLI for things that you don't actually need to use it for.


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki