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Samsung Galaxy S III  (Source: mobilemag.com)
Samsung did well, but many worry that it won't see this amount of money rolling in next year as the smartphone market continues to grow competitive

Samsung reported strong financial earnings in the third quarter, but now faces slowed smartphone momentum in the future as the market gets more crowded.

Samsung posted $7.4 billion USD in Q3 2012 operating profit. Net profit rose 90 percent to $5.9 billion USD. 

During the third quarter, Samsung sold 56.3 million smartphones, giving it a global market share of 31.3 percent. Apple only sold 26.9 million iPhones in the same quarter. The Samsung Galaxy S III alone accounted for 18-20 million shipments from July to September.

While Samsung did well in the smartphone department, particularly with its Galaxy line of devices, it didn't do so hot in chip sales. The chip division dropped 28 percent to $1 billion USD.

Samsung rocked a healthy profit overall this quarter, but many worry that the electronics maker won't see this amount of money rolling in next year as the smartphone market continues to grow competitive.

In fact, Samsung's profit is expected to grow 16 percent next year -- down from this year's predictions of 73 percent.

Samsung has other strong businesses, like tablets and OLED TVs, but analysts say these sectors aren't quite ready to sell the way that Galaxy is selling.

Samsung's tablets, in particular, haven't been able to keep up with the like of the iPad and Kindle Fire. Now, with the iPad Mini and Windows 8 tablets making a fresh appearance into the market (not to mention Google's Nexus 7 and a refreshed Kindle Fire HD line has made its way into the market), Samsung seems to continuously fall behind.

Samsung also took a hard hit with tablets due to its patent war with Apple. Apple worked pretty hard to ban Samsung's smartphones and tablets around the world, and successfully accomplished this in countries like Germany and Australia. Samsung launched a few lawsuits of its own regarding 3G patents, and was also able to lift the ban on its Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia in December 2011. However, Samsung wasn't so lucky in Germany, where the Galaxy Tab 10.1 is still banned.

Back in August, a jury in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California reached an unfavorable verdict for Samsung, saying that the South Korean electronics maker was guilty of violating technology patents. In other words, most of Samsung's smartphones and tablets in question were found guilt of copying Apple's iPhone and iPad designs. It was ordered to pay $1.05 billion in damages to Apple.

Earlier this week, Samsung Display decided to cut ties with Apple, saying it will no longer ship LCDs to Apple next year. Its LCD shipments to Apple have been cut more and more over time due to Apple wanting huge discounts, but the recent patent infringement drama couldn't have helped either.

More recently, an ITC judge found that Samsung violated four Apple patents, including
the flat front face with wider borders at the top and bottom, the lozenge-shaped speaker about the display screen; the translucent images for applications displayed on the screen, and the device's ability to detect when a headset is plugged in.

Samsung did get a little bit of relief in the UK, though, when a judge ordered Apple to post a notice on its UK site that Samsung didn't copy the iPad. Apple complied, but in a very snarky way.



Source: Samsung



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RE: Impressive
By testerguy on 10/28/2012 3:42:04 AM , Rating: 2
You were going to write a rebuttal - but you can't, because all of my comments are factually the case.

You say 'get a life' as if any of my points are disputable or represent my 'opinion'. They aren't. They are all proven via independent benchmarks, or just logical facts.

Your claim that PenTile is indistinguishable from RGB is the only flat out raging fanboy denial here, so I tell you - it's a phone, not a religion - accept the reality that PenTile is inferior.

[Link removed to allow comment through]

quote:
You’ll notice on a PenTile screen that certain colors won’t display correctly. Such is the case of the DX2 or Atrix which use a RGBW layout – the pixels have to constantly fight with each other to produce the correct color that you should be seeing. You may also struggle to view black text over white backgrounds on websites when zoomed all the way out or find yourself with a headache after quickly scrolling. And then there is the fact that everything tends to look a little grainy. It’s very difficult for a Pentile RGBW display to produce straight lines, some times leaving spots with an almost jagged (or grainy) edge to them.


[Link removed to allow comment through]

Furthermore, the PPI of the SG3 is not at the point where the PenTile is not obvious.

quote:
The disadvantages of PenTile are widely recognized to be fuzzy text on some color combinations (most noticeably saturated red) and color fringing on high contrast edges on the screen . For the most part it is not visible but it is one of those cases of “when you see it, it is hard to disregard”. PenTile panels also tend to skew colors when viewed from an angle . The disadvantages become less prominent when the resolution moves up and with its 1280x720 pixel resolution (for more on pixel resolution controversy see our Nexus article), Samsung should have ironed out the most visible effects but the argument remains . Samsung agreed when they launched the Galaxy SII but it seems that they have reversed their stance on the matter without any technical breakthroughs, which surely seems contradicting. In the end we guess it all comes down to marketing instead of integrity. We had hoped to see a Super AMOLED “Plus” screen with RGB in Galaxy SIII but unfortunately it failed to materialize this year.


http://www.flatpanelshd.com/focus.php?subaction=sh...

quote:
If you try hard, you will be able to spot evidence of the Pentile matrix affecting the smoothness of fine edges


quote:
Sadly, while that may have been a great compliment a year or two ago, the quality and viewing angles of AMOLED have recently been bypassed by refinements in LCD technology


http://www.theverge.com/2012/5/25/3042640/samsung-...

Furthermore, your argument on angular resolution and visual acuity simply buys into Apple's fixed distance, 20/20 vision claim. The reality is that average people have better than 20/20 vision, and even not being able to distinguish the subpixels doesn't take away the other effects such as fringing on black text. It is certainly not the case that RGBG is superior to our own eyes, the only arguments in favour of PenTile is that you can't notice that it's worse. That isn't the same thing. If you argue that you can't notice it - then you also wouldn't notice the downscaling of HD movies, or the higher resolution which is claimed on the SG3. Fundamentally, the SG3 has fewer sub pixels with which to represent pictures, and those fewer pixels are spread over a larger area.

For many, many people - including me, I can visually see the inferior quality.

Contrast to the iPhone 5 review on Anandtech:

quote:
Wrapping up, the iPhone 5 display is a quantum leap better than the display on the iPhone 4. Contrast levels and light output have both been increased, and color performance is astonishing. The full sRGB gamut is present here, and color errors are remarkably low even for a high end desktop display. While many were hoping for a move to OLED or some other screen innovation, this really is a huge step up that is very easy to quantify. To put this in perspective, in the past few years I've reviewed probably 30-40 different displays, from PC monitors to TVs to projectors. Not a single one, out of the box, can put up the Gretag Macbeth dE numbers that the iPhone can, and perhaps one projector (which listed for $20,000) can approach the grayscale and color accuracy out of the box.


As for your question regarding JPEG images - they are most definitely inferior (visually - and obviously) in terms of quality when compared to PNG or BMP. That's obvious, which kinda defeats your whole rant.

Finally - you can be absolutely sure that Samsung, when it releases the next phone with AMOLED+ (the plus is even their admittance that it's superior) will be pointing out that the new display isn't PenTile and how that's superior.


RE: Impressive
By Solandri on 10/29/2012 11:13:14 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
You were going to write a rebuttal - but you can't, because all of my comments are factually the case.

No, it's because I have a life and have better things to do than troll on tech forums all weekend.

quote:
Your claim that PenTile is indistinguishable from RGB is the only flat out raging fanboy denial here, so I tell you - it's a phone, not a religion - accept the reality that PenTile is inferior.

Way to miss my point. A pentile display is indistinguishable from RGB once you reach sufficiently small angular resolution. Once you reach that point, it's a more efficient allocation of sub-pixels since it better matches the peculiarities of the human eye's color sensitivity.

At lower ppi, the RGB display is better. But once you reach that threshold ppi, the pentile display is indistinguishable and the RGB display is wasting sub-pixels. Per Apple's marketing, the Retina display is at that point, and hence it's wasting sub-pixels compared to a 4.5 inch 1280x720 pentile display.

At higher ppi, both are wasting pixels, but the pentile display is wasting fewer pixels.


"If you look at the last five years, if you look at what major innovations have occurred in computing technology, every single one of them came from AMD. Not a single innovation came from Intel." -- AMD CEO Hector Ruiz in 2007














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