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  (Source: i.i.com)
10,000 out of 12,000 sexually explicit pictures uploaded by teens were reposted by parasite websites

The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) found that 88 percent of nude or sexually explicit photos/videos posted by teens online are stolen reposted without permission. 
 
The IWF study took a look at 12,224 risque teen images/videos from 68 websites (like social networks) and found that 10,776 of them had been reposted without permission by "parasite" porn websites, which stole the images from commonplace sites like Facebook. The study was conducted over a 47-hour period during four weeks. 
 
"This research gives an unsettling indication of the number of images and videos on the Internet featuring young people performing sexually explicit acts or posing," said Susie Hargreaves, CEO of IWF. "It also highlights the problem of control of these images -- once an image has been copied on to a parasite website, it will no longer suffice to simply remove the image from the online account
 
"We need young people to realize that once an image or a video has gone online, they may never be able to remove it entirely." 
 
The study was unable to analyze pictures or messages exchanged over email, smartphone messages or social networks that are protected by firewalls, but it did mention that some of the pictures were taken from stolen cell phones and placed on parasite websites. 
 
The IWF report also gave examples of some teens that were deeply affected by having sexually explicit pictures placed on parasite websites. One example was a girl who placed naked pictures on the Internet, then lost control of them as other sites began reposting them. 
 
"I came to regret posting photographs of myself naively on the Internet and tried to forget about it, but strangers recognized me from the photographs and made lewd remarks at school," said the girl. "I endured so much bullying because of this photograph and the others...I was eventually admitted for severe depression and was treated for a suicide attempt."

Source: TechCrunch



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RE: And this is a suprise...
By DiscoWade on 10/23/2012 9:12:52 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Good judgment comes from experience.
Experience comes from bad judgment.


That is a good way of putting it. One thing that helped me was my dad's paddle and my mom's slap. When I was younger, I didn't do bad things because I was afraid of the whipping. Now that I'm older, I can appreciate how they made me a better person. I was also a mouthy child. I would say things that I knew would hurt people. I was so bad that my mom slapped me so many times that my face was calloused and the slap didn't hurt anymore. But it did hurt my pride. Eventually I got the message and now I've learned to control what I say, though sometimes I still let bad things out.

Corporal punishment worked for me. I was even spanked in school by the assistant principal! (I didn't tell my parents, because if they found out, I knew I would get another at home.) Try that today. However, I've seen children when a spanking wouldn't work. It is not for every child, but discipline in some form is. Parents need to be parents and not friends of their children.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By Dr of crap on 10/23/2012 9:19:47 AM , Rating: 2
OH you can't do that now. AND time outs work SOOOO well.
Hit your kids if they need it.
They turn out soooo much better.

The greatest generation that fought WWII were hit and look how great they turned out - respected thier elders, and gladly went to war!

Try THAT today!


RE: And this is a suprise...
By dark matter on 10/23/2012 12:46:16 PM , Rating: 2
Please do shut up.


"If they're going to pirate somebody, we want it to be us rather than somebody else." -- Microsoft Business Group President Jeff Raikes














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