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  (Source: i.i.com)
10,000 out of 12,000 sexually explicit pictures uploaded by teens were reposted by parasite websites

The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) found that 88 percent of nude or sexually explicit photos/videos posted by teens online are stolen reposted without permission. 
 
The IWF study took a look at 12,224 risque teen images/videos from 68 websites (like social networks) and found that 10,776 of them had been reposted without permission by "parasite" porn websites, which stole the images from commonplace sites like Facebook. The study was conducted over a 47-hour period during four weeks. 
 
"This research gives an unsettling indication of the number of images and videos on the Internet featuring young people performing sexually explicit acts or posing," said Susie Hargreaves, CEO of IWF. "It also highlights the problem of control of these images -- once an image has been copied on to a parasite website, it will no longer suffice to simply remove the image from the online account
 
"We need young people to realize that once an image or a video has gone online, they may never be able to remove it entirely." 
 
The study was unable to analyze pictures or messages exchanged over email, smartphone messages or social networks that are protected by firewalls, but it did mention that some of the pictures were taken from stolen cell phones and placed on parasite websites. 
 
The IWF report also gave examples of some teens that were deeply affected by having sexually explicit pictures placed on parasite websites. One example was a girl who placed naked pictures on the Internet, then lost control of them as other sites began reposting them. 
 
"I came to regret posting photographs of myself naively on the Internet and tried to forget about it, but strangers recognized me from the photographs and made lewd remarks at school," said the girl. "I endured so much bullying because of this photograph and the others...I was eventually admitted for severe depression and was treated for a suicide attempt."

Source: TechCrunch



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RE: And this is a suprise...
By Solandri on 10/23/2012 3:02:27 AM , Rating: 5
Um, that's why they're called kids. You aren't born with common sense. You develop it with experience. Kids don't have that experience (initially).

Good judgment comes from experience.
Experience comes from bad judgment.

And I'm sure any parent of a teen could talk your ear off about how much they've tried to relay the common sense lessons they've learned from decades of life. The teen just shuts them off, saying "it's different today from when you were a kid." Or "you don't understand what I'm going through." At that age, it's typical to think that the ideas of older people (like their parents) are outdated and irrelevant to modern teens. So much so that they'll frequently set out to do precisely the opposite of what their parents tell them just to "prove them wrong."

Then they grow up, have kids, and get to experience the joys of raising a teen who behaves exactly the way they did to their parents.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By TSS on 10/23/12, Rating: 0
RE: And this is a suprise...
By Paj on 10/23/2012 8:22:44 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
You cannot use experience or the age of kids to justify not teaching them right from wrong.


That's not what he's saying. He's saying that we cant expect kids to have the best judgement, as they don't have experience to back it up. He never said anything about not trying to teach them.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By Dr of crap on 10/23/2012 8:39:38 AM , Rating: 3
AND he never said he would teach them.
Better read his post again.
He's basically saying that is what ALL kids do - WRONG.
Spoken from two who do not have kids I'd bet!

The reason that MORE kids act that way them they did 30 years ago - BAD PARENTING - it's that simple.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By dark matter on 10/23/2012 12:44:34 PM , Rating: 1
What he is actually saying is that kids will be kids.

The role of a parent is to guide your children, not stand in the middle of the room SHOUTING like some puffed up know it all.

Kids 30 years ago couldn't act that way, because there was no such thing as the Internet back then, and I'm sure the local photo shop wouldn't be too pleased about the kind of pictures they were being asked to develop.

I have two children. And you come across as the worst kind of parent.

If you think you're attitude is going to g'tee your children are not going to make a balls up at some point of there life, then you're going to handle that point in their life terribly.

Just a word of advice there, from parent to another.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By Dr of crap on 10/23/2012 2:35:28 PM , Rating: 4
Sorry my kids are both over the age of 18 are going to be fine parents themselves. They have respect for their elders and authority and we had no trouble from either of them.

Agreed parents NEED to guide kids. I didn't mention scream at the kids and bark orders like a drill sargnt, I said set boundries and stick to it. Today all you hear is the threat and then the give in. IT'S OK TO SAY NO and not give in. They might hate you but only for a short time.

It's called parenting, not how to make your kid your BFF by giving them everything!

But 30 years ago their where just as bad of things that could be had by kids - drugs, babies, ...ect. Each generation has it bad things, and each new generation is going to say, "You (the parent) had it easy, it's HARD today". BS


RE: And this is a suprise...
By Samus on 10/23/12, Rating: 0
RE: And this is a suprise...
By Dr of crap on 10/23/2012 8:35:56 AM , Rating: 4
WRONG!
You obviously do not have kids.
Those arguements you stated have been used for years, maybe even by your parents when they were kids.

DO THE PARENTING!

Parents are not suppose to be the kids friends. Do the hard stuff. Make them yell at you. Make the tough decisions. BUT if you'd done it at a early age and the kids respected you, you wouldn't have a battle on your hands when they got to be teens. My kids respect me and I didn't any trouble with them when the hit the teen years. Say what you want it ALL parenting. IT'S OK to tell the 2-16 year old NO. AND YOU CAN'T have that and DO NOT GIVE IN AT ANYTIME!
When my kids brought over friends, you could tell alot about the parents and how the household ran by how the friends behaved.

BE the parent. It's the toughest job ever. AND most should not have kids. When you have kids it time for you to grow up and stop doiong some of the things you WANT to do and do the things you SHOULD do to make your kids better!

It's THAT simple!


RE: And this is a suprise...
By theapparition on 10/23/2012 9:31:21 AM , Rating: 2
As always, the real truth lies somewhere in between.

First off, there is no one sized fits all universal parenting handbook. If there was, then it would be easy.

In my experience, parenting is a balance between teaching the right values (and leading by example), setting firm rules, but also letting your children make some of their own decisions, and they must also deal with the consequences of such.

I've seen many heavy handed families who raise very respectful kids....until they get out of the house. A taste of freedom quickly becomes intoxicating like a drug. You could always tell the preacher's daughter at college. She was the one gangbanging at the frats.

And every kid is different. Some respond well to heavy handed parenting, others rebel. You have to be flexible as a parent and realize the style that works the best. No kid is the same, so why would the same parenting style work for all of them.

But the point of the original article I don't get is nude pictures on Facebook or any social network (Google+, Myspace, AmIhot, etc). I thought they didn't allow any nude or rated R photos.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By AMDftw on 10/23/2012 9:36:31 AM , Rating: 2
You know, I can disagree here. Good valid points. I was always grounded or in trouble as a child. It took me 22 years to realize my parents were right and I was wrong. A few years ago my father asked me if he was to strict on me. I told him no and I was glad he was. I told him he, He shouldn't have soften up with my 2 younger brother. Both have been in and out of jail. Why?, because he let them do as they please. I would have never became the man I am now. I follow the same why with my kids currently. When I say they are grounded or in trouble I hold my word. Parents these days are to soft. That's why that call it "Tough love"


RE: And this is a suprise...
By dark matter on 10/23/2012 12:41:21 PM , Rating: 2
We all look forward to your children winning nobel peace prizes then shall we, oh amazing parent.

You've obviously never heard of free will.

As much as you like to think you can control people, you'll find YOUR wrong, no matter how many capital letters you use.

The only thing you can do with children, is do your best, and hope for the best.

At the end of the day, people will do stupid things, regardless.

If this is news to you, God help your kids.



RE: And this is a suprise...
By JediJeb on 10/23/2012 9:15:20 PM , Rating: 2
There is free will, but if children never learn that there are limits and consequences in how they exercise that free will, they will never learn how to live and succeed in the real world. Everyone has the free will to jump off a cliff, but they don't have the right to expect they won't get hurt once they hit the ground. Just like the ground is the unavoidable limit to free will in that case, parents must set limits on a child's free will and make the consequences stick if they push past those limits. If your child does not learn from the limits you set then it is their fault how they turn out, if you never set those limits then how they turn out is the parent's fault.

People who believe that there are no consequences to how they exercise their free will are the ones who usually end up in jail or worse.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By DiscoWade on 10/23/2012 9:12:52 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Good judgment comes from experience.
Experience comes from bad judgment.


That is a good way of putting it. One thing that helped me was my dad's paddle and my mom's slap. When I was younger, I didn't do bad things because I was afraid of the whipping. Now that I'm older, I can appreciate how they made me a better person. I was also a mouthy child. I would say things that I knew would hurt people. I was so bad that my mom slapped me so many times that my face was calloused and the slap didn't hurt anymore. But it did hurt my pride. Eventually I got the message and now I've learned to control what I say, though sometimes I still let bad things out.

Corporal punishment worked for me. I was even spanked in school by the assistant principal! (I didn't tell my parents, because if they found out, I knew I would get another at home.) Try that today. However, I've seen children when a spanking wouldn't work. It is not for every child, but discipline in some form is. Parents need to be parents and not friends of their children.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By Dr of crap on 10/23/2012 9:19:47 AM , Rating: 2
OH you can't do that now. AND time outs work SOOOO well.
Hit your kids if they need it.
They turn out soooo much better.

The greatest generation that fought WWII were hit and look how great they turned out - respected thier elders, and gladly went to war!

Try THAT today!


RE: And this is a suprise...
By dark matter on 10/23/2012 12:46:16 PM , Rating: 2
Please do shut up.


RE: And this is a suprise...
By IS81 on 10/23/2012 12:24:53 PM , Rating: 2
Experience can come from good judgement as well. The idea that we can't learn without making mistakes is false and, at times, dangerous.


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