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Time for humans to start thinking about moving says Hawking

For many years humans have dreamed of one day colonizing other planets and moons.  Although research would be an important reason for the foreign bases, could the survival of the human race depend on whether or not we can colonize other planets?  World-renowned astrophysicist Stephen Hawking recently said that humans need to colonize a planet or moon because the Earth might face destruction -- A man made disaster -- global warming being a good example -- or natural disaster could potentially destroy the planet. 

Although he believes humans can colonize the moon within 20 years, and establish a sufficient base on Mars within 40 years, humans "won't find anywhere as nice as Earth," unless we visit another solar system.  The moon looks to be like an ideal place for a potential new colony.  Not only does it appear to have everything needed to sustain humans, ice has also been found at its poles.

Nations have been thinking about colonizing other planets for years.  DailyTech earlier reported that NASA is working towards a permanent moon base that would be a stepping stone to allow astronauts to explore Mars firsthand.  Swedish researchers are also studying different ways to have a self-sustaining colony on the moon.


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The tenth planet
By itlnstln on 6/15/2006 6:53:03 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The moon looks to be like an ideal place for a potential new colony. Not only does the planet appear to have everything needed to sustain humans, ice has also been found at the poles.


Moon = Planet???




RE: The tenth planet
By HDBanger on 6/15/2006 7:03:33 AM , Rating: 2
And when the earth does get hit by something, or blown up, what good is the moon goin to do anyone? It will go spiraling out into space and smash into something without the earth to hold its orbit. Or be smashed by bits of the earth as it breaks up. I think we need to start worryin more about our politicians, err, crooks, than anything else.


RE: The tenth planet
By Fnoob on 6/15/2006 8:48:19 AM , Rating: 2
If you look at the surface of the moon, or really any other non-gaseous body in our solar system, you can plainly see that hundreds of potentially catastrophic impacts have occured - without the whole planet blowing up.

The impact force required to break the planet up would likely require something either so large and/or dense that we would (hopefully) see it coming. The possibility that scares me is the smallish, very dense, superfast rogue body that decides to land in the Gulf whilst I sleep. I keep picturing that huge wave in the Poseidon flick tearing through the 'hood. Not good.



RE: The tenth planet
By oTAL on 6/15/2006 8:25:28 AM , Rating: 1
Yes... the moon is a planet... check the definition....


RE: The tenth planet
By Sunday Ironfoot on 6/15/2006 8:44:53 AM , Rating: 2
The moon is a satellite surely?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satellite

"A satellite is any object that orbits another object (which is known as its primary). All masses that are part of the solar system, including the Earth, are satellites either of the Sun, or satellites of those objects, such as the Moon."


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