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  (Source: strumors.automobilemag.com)
The Toyota Prius plug-in has a 540-mile range while the Chevrolet Volt has a 380-mile range

After receivng an EPA rating of 100 miles-per-gallon equivalent (MPGe) city/highway combined, Ford's C-MAX Energi has now been named the king of range with 620 miles per tank/charge.

According to Ford, the C-MAX Energi crushes the competition with an EPA rated 108 MPGe city and an EPA rated 620-mile overall driving range. The Energi is also capable of traveling 21 miles in all-electric mode and has 195 horsepower with a fully charged battery.

The Toyota Prius plug-in, on the other hand, has a 540-mile range while the Chevrolet Volt has a 380-mile range.


Not only will the C-MAX Energi be America's most fuel efficient vehicle with the longest range, but it will also be the most affordable. It has a starting price of $29,995, but is eligible for the federal tax credit. The EPA label also noted that customers could save almost $7,000 in gas over the course of five years with the C-MAX Energi.

“C-MAX Energi is America’s most efficient utility vehicle, a great symbol of how Ford gives customers the power to choose leading fuel-efficiency across our lineup with gas prices spiraling upwards of $5 a gallon in some parts of the country,” said John Davis, C-MAX chief engineer. “The C-MAX Energi’s leading range also means customers can spend more time on the road and more money on their priorities instead of at the gas pump.”

Ford also mentioned that the C-MAX Energi's range was designed to address congestion problems. A longer electric range means no wasted fuel while sitting in traffic.

The C-MAX Energi, due out this Fall, will also offer many of Ford's features like SYNC with MyFord Touch, MyFord Mobile, ECO Cruise and SmartGauge with EcoGuide.


Source: Ford



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RE: Credit not rebate
By bobsmith1492 on 10/19/2012 10:48:55 PM , Rating: 5
I wish people would stop arguing this point every EV car article! It doesn't matter!!

Any reasonable person who is paying less than $7k in taxes would never EVER buy a brand new $30,000 car so the point is moot.


RE: Credit not rebate
By Mint on 10/19/2012 11:26:51 PM , Rating: 2
In this case, it's only a $3750 tax credit, so that emphasizes your point even further.

There's only ~15M cars sold per year in the US among 115M households. The vast majority of households paying less tax than that will be buying used cars.


RE: Credit not rebate
By Solandri on 10/20/2012 2:52:29 AM , Rating: 3
IRS tax brackets are:
10% - $0 to $8700 ($870 in taxes)
15% - $8701 to $35.350 (up to $3997.50 in taxes)
25% - $35,351 - $85,650 (up to $12,575 in taxes)

In addition there's a standard deduction of $5950 (the first $5950 you make is untaxed).

So for you to be paying $7k in federal taxes, you'd have to be making $49,830 ($0 on the first $5950, $870 from the 10% bracket, $3997.50 from the 15%, and $2132.50 from the 25%). A new $30,000 car is entirely reasonable with that income.

To owe $3750 in federal taxes, you'd have to be making at least $32,183.33. Normally I wouldn't consider this to be a healthy income level to buy a $26,245 new car. But after seeing how many poor people are willing to fork over the money for a new iPad, I don't try to predict what people will or won't buy anymore.

Also note that these are minimum incomes. If you itemize your deductions (e.g. you pay mortgage on your house), it's possible to have a much higher income and still owe less than $7000 or $3750 in federal taxes.

quote:
There's only ~15M cars sold per year in the US among 115M households. The vast majority of households paying less tax than that will be buying used cars.

That stat would only be relevant if people only kept a new car for a year. If the average duration of ownership for a new car is 5 years, then 15M/year in new car sales represents 75M households, or the majority. (Actually even that is suspect too since there are about 130M households but 250M passenger cars.)


RE: Credit not rebate
By FITCamaro on 10/20/2012 9:20:31 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
But after seeing how many poor people are willing to fork over the money for a new iPad, I don't try to predict what people will or won't buy anymore.


Well when they get the Earned Income Credit, don't have to pay for their food, housing, cell phone, or health care, of course they have money to buy $500 tablets.


RE: Credit not rebate
By mcnabney on 10/22/2012 10:43:38 AM , Rating: 2
The working poor don't buy tablets - but they do buy cell phones. The gov't subsidized phones are all basic phones. They can get a small discount on service on a smartphone though.

Are you really sure that you are jealous of the working poor? Their lives really do tend to suck.


RE: Credit not rebate
By RufusM on 10/22/2012 4:15:22 PM , Rating: 2
You should spend a few months working at a county level Human Services department. There are some true hard luck cases that deserve help, but most of the people they service (> 50%) are there because they've f'd their own life up due to extremely bad life choices (teen pregnancy, drugs and alchohol, etc.) You'd be surprised at how many 18-20 somethings there somehow find the extra dollars/credit card debt for a large flat panel TV, cable TV, a smartphone, iPad, game system, fancy car stereo, etc.

BTW it's not jealousy, it's outrage that the Human Services systems are so corrupted/broken.


RE: Credit not rebate
By StanO360 on 10/20/2012 6:00:57 PM , Rating: 2
Families are much higher brackets. There are lots of deductions. But this definitely applies for singles, or married no kids.


RE: Credit not rebate
By Mint on 10/20/2012 6:24:11 PM , Rating: 3
Dude, a new iPad/smartphone/computer every couple years is nothing compared to the expense of a new car!

quote:
That stat would only be relevant if people only kept a new car for a year. If the average duration of ownership for a new car is 5 years, then 15M/year in new car sales represents 75M households, or the majority.
Many household have more than one car. If the 5M most well off households have three cars and replace each one every three years, and the next 10M biggest spenders have two cars with each replaced every 5 years, that leaves 6M new cars per year for 100M households.

I seriously doubt the bottom two quintiles will comprise more than a trickle of new $25k+ car sales.


RE: Credit not rebate
By Dr of crap on 10/22/2012 8:21:49 AM , Rating: 2
So there you've hit on it.

THE ONES that REALLY would benefit from this tax credit, the ones that don't make much, even be in the running since they won't be able to buy the car!

THAT'S why the point keeps coming up!


RE: Credit not rebate
By Mint on 10/22/2012 4:19:20 PM , Rating: 2
No, the ones who would benefit from the credit are those who are willing to spend $30k on a new car. Virtually all of those households earn enough to pay $4k in federal income tax.


RE: Credit not rebate
By CharonPDX on 11/13/2012 3:08:01 PM , Rating: 2
You need a better accountant.

I bought a Prius, got the (then large) tax credit, and paid $0 in Federal Income Taxes that year. (aka: I got 100% of my paid taxes back.)

In fact, because of various other credits, I'm pretty sure I got money back. (I'd have to go back through my returns to be sure.)

I'm all for closing tax loopholes and equalizing taxes. Anyone who makes over $100K a year who claims they actually pay the stated tax rate is either lying, choosing to do so, or horribly bad with money. Just like no corporation pays the stated corporate tax rate. (My corporation only ever paid at most $1110 in income taxes, on half a million dollars revenue. $1000 federal, $100 state, $10 local. One year only. Every other year was less.)


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