backtop


Print 16 comment(s) - last by Brian H.. on Oct 20 at 8:04 AM


  (Source: space.skyrocket.de)
Orbcomm said it will be filing an insurance claim of $10 million to cover the prototype satellite as well as the cost of the launch and insurance policy

Orbcomm's prototype second-generation satellite, OG2, has fallen out of orbit after SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket failed to launch it into the correct trajectory.

Orbcomm, a satellite messaging service provider, had sent its OG2 prototype into space aboard SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket during the Oct. 7 launch to the International Space Station (ISS). The main mission was to send the Dragon capsule to the ISS for supplies, but NASA and SpaceX agreed to let Orbcomm send a satellite high into orbit on the Falcon 9 as a secondary part of the mission. 

However, a small mishap occurred during the Oct. 7 flight: one of the nine Merlin first-stage engines on Falcon 9 shut down. 

The Falcon 9 was still able to lift the Dragon to the ISS successfully on Oct. 10, but it was unable to launch the OG2 prototype far enough into orbit to collect an optimal amount of data. It wandered for four days before falling out of orbit. 

However, Orbcomm said that wandering satellite gathered enough data in the nearly four-day period to proceed with the full constellation launch next year. The constellation launch consists of sending 18 second-generation satellites into orbit aboard two Falcon 9 rockets. 

Orbcomm said it will be filing an insurance claim of $10 million to cover the prototype satellite as well as the cost of the launch and insurance policy. If the insurance underwriters accept this, Orbcomm will not need to launch another prototype. Rather, it would be able to launch all 18 satellites starting next year thanks to the amount of data collected during the recent launch. 

SpaceX added that Orbcomm knew that there was a chance that OG2 wouldn't make it into the correct orbit beforehand. 

"It is important to appreciate that Orbcomm understoof from the beginning that the orbit-raising maneuver was tentative," said Katherine Nelson, SpaceX spokeswoman. "They accepted that there was a high risk of their satellite remaining at the Dragon insertion orbit. SpaceX would not have agreed to fly their satellite otherwise, since this was not part of the core mission and there was a known, material risk of no altitude raise."

SpaceX's Dragon is currently at the ISS unloading 882 pounds of cargo, and will bring twice that amount of cargo back to Earth near the end of October. 


Source: MSNBC



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Insurance policy
By kattanna on 10/16/2012 1:19:24 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Since when has an insurance policy ever covered its own premium? That just makes no sense.


since this is FAR FAR from the first time they have launched a satellite into space.. they have a long record i'm sure with said insurance company. I'm 100% sure they have paid enough in past premiums on other launches with no payouts as they were a success that this was not a big deal to the insurance company, for the most part.


"People Don't Respect Confidentiality in This Industry" -- Sony Computer Entertainment of America President and CEO Jack Tretton














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki