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IdeaTab Lynx
Lenovo unveiled its IdeaPad Yoga 11, IdeaPad Yoga 13, IdeaTab Lynx and ThinkPad Twist

Windows 8 will be here in a little over two weeks, and Lenovo is prepared to show off its new spread of devices that will run Microsoft's newest operating system. 

Today, Lenovo unveiled its IdeaPad Yoga 11, IdeaPad Yoga 13, ThinkPad Twist and IdeaTab Lynx -- all Windows 8-powered convertibles. Lenovo is betting big that customers will want convertibles over traditional laptops or tablets, since convertibles combine the best of both worlds. 

IdeaPad Yoga 11

The IdeaPad Yoga 11 is an 11.6-inch Windows RT device with a display that flips 360 degrees backwards, transforming the laptop into a tablet with a stand, if needed. Under the hood, the Yoga 11 is packing a NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor, 2GB of RAM, up to 64GB of storage, a 1366x768 display resolution, a 720p webcam, two USB 2.0 ports, an HDMI port, a card reader, 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.0. 

You can pick up a Yoga 11 starting at $799. It's available in Silver Gray and Clementine Orange. 


IdeaPad Yoga 13

The IdeaPad Yoga 13, like the Yoga 11, flips 360 backwards to turn the laptop into a tablet-like device. It also comes in Silver Gray and Clementine Orange, but most other specs are completely different. For starters, the Yoga 13 has a 13.3-inch display and runs Windows 8. It also has Intel Core i5 and i7 processors with Intel HD 4000 integrated graphics, up to 8GB of RAM, up to 256GB of solid-state storage, a 1600x900 resolution, a 720p webcam, USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports, an HDMI port, a card reader, 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.0. 

The Yoga 13's price will start at $1,099.


ThinkPad Twist

The ThinkPad Twist does exactly what the name indicates -- the display flips down and twists to cover the keyboard, turning the laptop into a tablet. It has a 12.5-inch display, 1366x768 resolution, Intel Core i3/i5/i7 processors with Intel HD 4000 integrated graphics, up to 8GB of RAM, a 720p webcam, two USB 3.0 ports, 802.11n, Bluetooth 4.0, Gigabit Ethernet, Mini DisplayPort, Mini HDMI port and three storage options: 320GB HDD, 500GB HDD or 128GB SDD.

The Twist starts at $849.


IdeaTab Lynx

The IdeaTab Lynx is basically a tablet with optional keyboard dock, turning the device into a laptop. The display is 11.6 inches and it features a Clover Trail-based Intel Atom Z2760 processor, 2GB of DDR2, 32GB/64GB storage options, 2 MP front-facing camera, a 1366x768 resolution, Micro USB 2.0 port, Micro HDMI port, microSD card slot, 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.0.

The starting price for the Lynx is $599 for the tablet alone, but adding the keyboard dock will cost an additional $149.

Source: Lenovo



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RE: time Warp
By Penti on 10/11/2012 6:57:26 AM , Rating: 2
It's not quite that sad overall when there comes new devices, some with active digitizer and even Android devices support it. But it is that sad for the most part in the low end and if it fails in the consumer market it will be reserved for the same market that Tablet PC's occupy today. Seems kinda pointless with capacitive touch and Windows (especially when not even Microsoft believes in fully fledge slates), as most devices will have multi-touch track-pads and keyboards. Effective input methods are important and Microsoft just doesn't seem to be there. But they support pens quite good. On a desktop there is of course always wacom tablet's for creative and engineering usage. Shouldn't be any focus to switch to a finger touch system there.

There will still be none-x86 tablets as well as Android running x86-tablets for that matter. I.e. market place for iOS stuff from Apple. In productivity and as a complement for a mice/track-pad a active pen is much better then just touch though and many will realize that. Hoping for a new ThinkPad Android tablet with ntrig/wacom here. Not interested in Idea-series. Business and consumer stuff will still be different in some points but hopefully it will come to just configuration and services in the future. Samsung seems quite capable of pulling it off.

Microsoft really won't be able to compete with iPad, even if it is 2-3 different devices now it's still a single vendor with large sales. PC vendors altogether will of course have many different types of devices that together will sell more. I still view tablets and Tablet PC's as different devices and categories. You might have a Android tablet for browsing the web and watching netflix plus a larger notebook, where the two collides is where Tablet PC's act as replacements for the smaller devices, a ARM tablet never fully replaces a desktop.


"If you look at the last five years, if you look at what major innovations have occurred in computing technology, every single one of them came from AMD. Not a single innovation came from Intel." -- AMD CEO Hector Ruiz in 2007














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