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  (Source: Universal Pictures)
The new automated traffic fine system incorporates sensors built into vehicles and Communication and Information Technologies (CITs)

If you're the type of driver that leans more toward offensive rather than defensive driving, you might want to take it easy on the speeding and pay attention to those stoplights -- systems to automate traffic fines are in the making. 
 
Researchers from the Universidad Carlos III Madrid's (UC3M) Information and Communication Technology Security Group have been working on the E-SAVE project, which aims to use IT to improve traffic regulation. 
 
The new automated traffic fine system incorporates sensors built into vehicles and Communication and Information Technologies (CITs). The new system has three main components: a mechanism that allows drivers to report others while maintaining anonymity and authenticity; a way for sending the notification of a fine directly to the vehicle in question, and a mechanism that allows the offending driver to create electronic evidence in order to defend him/herself in the case that they receive a notification. The offending driver can do this by "asking" surrounding drivers with sensors to be witnesses to the scene. 
 
The whole system is based on vehicle-to-vehicle communication via sensors, where cars can trade information in the flow of traffic and allow for crimes to be reported. 
 
A huge aspect of the new system is to keep driver information confidential so that credentials are not stolen or abused. It's also important that driver information is updated and accurate for the purpose of sending fines correctly. The team is doing this through a project called PRECIOUS, where cryptographic methods of anonymous authentication and zero knowledge tests are used. This rids the duplication of information. 
 
The system will be tested in "the coming months."

Source: Universidad Carlos III in Madrid (UC3M)



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RE: This is BULL$#+!.
By inperfectdarkness on 10/10/2012 3:58:41 AM , Rating: 2
I seriously hope they're not pulling government funds for this reserach. Next thing you know, we'll be getting fines for not doing a courtesy flush or for leaving the toilet seat up.

Why are people so blind to the idea that personal responsibility is the one key factor which drives economic prosperity?


RE: This is BULL$#+!.
By nolisi on 10/10/2012 12:21:04 PM , Rating: 2
If that were true, then you wouldn't have companies cooking books, ponzi schemes, outright theft, or businesses using undocumented workers.

Personal responsibility doesn't drive economic prosperity- profit motive does. Profit motive can encourage people to participate in economics responsibly, creating growth for everyone.

Profit motive, unfortunately, can cause people to do the very things that destroy wealth and undermine economic prosperity.

With that said- I don't support the idea that *individuals* should be constantly monitored. Driving has inherent risks because of large amounts of moving mass. While we can record things like speed, distance and movement, cannot record everything such as whether a truck dropped rocks on the road or a neighboring driver is brandishing a gun. It is also possible (and common) for people to make bad decisions in a perfectly safe manner (according to numbers), and still cause incidents.

I'm in favor of spending money to protect individuals (seat belts, blind spot monitoring, airbags, sufficiently strong frame), but let's not spend money to create another revenue generating system for the state, which will do nothing to curtail the bad habits of drivers- especially those whose finances aren't even modestly impacted by a traffic fine. Traffic fines have failed to curtail bad drivers.


RE: This is BULL$#+!.
By dgingerich on 10/10/2012 2:50:10 PM , Rating: 2
If there weren't people who are so lazy they don't bother to think when they get involved in things, situations like that wouldn't even happen. Things like "Really? I can double my money in a year?" and "There's no risk of losing my money in this investment?" and "I can make money without having to pay out anything?" If they'd just stop and think, they'd know those situations don't exist. The world just doesn't work that way.

Unfortunately, there are just too many lazy/stupid (same thing, really) people in the world. People don't bother think think, so they fall for things like Ponzi schemes, Nigerian scams, and "international lottery" schemes. They fall for this, and these things work, because people are being stupid.

Let them get caught in the schemes. It will weed out some who just shouldn't be allowed to procreate. They'll become homeless and they bloodlines will die out.

If you know a company is a ripoff, don't invest in them. (Citibank and Capital One, for example.) People investing in a company should be held responsible for the behavior of that company, and if the company is involved in criminal behavior, the company should be totally broken down and all assets sold off to pay restitution. The investors shouldn't get squat back.

If a company you're working for is a ripoff, either to their employees or their customers, quit and go elsewhere. I've done that numerous times.

As for driving safety, I'm all for revocation of licenses for certain people, like the idiot in the BMW X5 I see driving along the shoulder nearly every day on my way home from work, or the stupid old man constantly going 45 in a 65 zone. (I've been hit from behind 6 times because someone was going too slowly ahead of me and someone else came up behind me too fast. I call it getting caught between an a-hole and an idiot, and both of them are to blame.) Fines don't do squat to deter people, but removing their ability to drive would. There's too freaking many people on the road as it is, and most of them too stupid to drive right. Driving is a privilege, and it should stay that way. I say get some of these idiots off the road, permanently.


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