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Print 64 comment(s) - last by xti.. on Oct 9 at 12:16 PM

Jobs passed away one year ago today from complications with pancreatic cancer

Today marks one year since Apple's former CEO Steve Jobs died, and the tech company is paying tribute to its late leader on the Apple homepage.

When visiting the Apple website today, a video automatically appears instead of the usual product tabs for shopping. The video, which is nearly two minutes long, is a montage of Jobs from his early days at Apple to his later years.

The video highlights some of Apple's largest moments with Jobs, such as the unveiling of major products like the iMac, the iPod and the iPhone. Along with soft cello playing in the background are quotes from Jobs over the years.

At the end of the video, a message from current Apple CEO Tim Cook appears:

Steve’s passing one year ago today was a sad and difficult time for all of us. I hope that today everyone will reflect on his extraordinary life and the many ways he made the world a better place.
 
One of the greatest gifts Steve gave to the world is Apple. No company has ever inspired such creativity or set such high standards for itself. Our values originated from Steve and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple. We share the great privilege and responsibility of carrying his legacy into the future.
 
I’m incredibly proud of the work we are doing, delivering products that our customers love and dreaming up new ones that will delight them down the road. It’s a wonderful tribute to Steve’s memory and everything he stood for.
 
- Tim

Jobs died from complications with pancreatic cancer one year ago today at the age of 56. Just previous to that, in August 2011, Jobs had stepped down from his position as Apple CEO. Cook stepped in as his successor.

Source: Apple



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RE: Tim Cook is no Steve Jobs
By alpha754293 on 10/5/2012 2:02:55 PM , Rating: 0
Because of all of the technical challenges that comes with shrinking a device.

Why do you think that IBM has fallen behind Intel in lithography processes? If it was easy, everybody would be doing it already.

Heat transfer and thermal management require area and space. When you shrink a device, you're fighting against precisely that.

Let's see you try to shrink a CPU where the trace paths would be so close that the resistance heating in them can cause them to short because they're so small and so close together. (Which means that you have to come up with a new material to use for the wiring so that it won't flex so much when current is passing through it.) (e.g. using nickel wires instead of cooper wires)


By StevoLincolnite on 10/5/2012 2:14:33 PM , Rating: 2
I was referring to the iPad, not CPU architectures and lithography.
But even then, shrinking a processor these days isn't really innovative, it's more or less expected, it's breakthroughs like 3D transistors or Die stacking that are what is innovative in such an industry.

quote:
Let's see you try to shrink a CPU


Which isn't going to happen, I don't have the equipment nor the brains to build a complex processor by hand (Not to mention the years it would take.) let alone shrink one to a smaller node and I doubt you do either.


RE: Tim Cook is no Steve Jobs
By Camikazi on 10/5/2012 2:41:45 PM , Rating: 1
If any of the electronics inside the iPad Mini is gonna shrink you can bet that Apple will have absolutely 0 to do with it. They do not manufacture a thing, they do not come up with ways to make electronics, they do not create lithography methods to make things smaller they just order parts from companies who can do it. As for the smaller size it is in between an iPhone and an iPad, they already know how to cool an iPhone so cooling a slightly bigger version won't be all that difficult since you will have close to the same tech but more space. iPad Mini is not some techincal marvel, it is a bigger iPhone and sine the iPhone works then the Mini won't be hard to make work.


By TakinYourPoints on 10/5/2012 4:40:58 PM , Rating: 2
Incorrect, the A6 is a custom design. They've spent billions on semiconductor companies and the fruits of their labor are paying off. The iPhone 5 has faster performance than any other smartphone out there without compromising on battery life, all before mass availability of the Cortex A15. Everyone, Anand included, assumed that Apple somehow got enough volume of A15s for the iPhone 5. Nobody expected Apple to come out with their own custom SoC.

Before this they were doing a lot of custom design work with their desktop/laptop motherboards and the internal layouts for their prior mobile devices. Nobody had the style of logic board that the iPhone used. That doesn't just materialize out of nothing, otherwise somebody else would have made something like the iPhone before Apple did.

Even their collaborations are driven by what they've needed, things like the custom CPU package they worked with Intel on for the first gen Macbook Airs.

Obviously someone has to implement that design into physical manufacturing, but that's standard for any hardware company.

I do agree that making an iPad Mini isn't hard work, at this point the groundwork has been laid by both the iPhone and the iPad. The only real difference is the size of the display and the battery.


RE: Tim Cook is no Steve Jobs
By Xplorer4x4 on 10/6/2012 1:18:25 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Because of all of the technical challenges that comes with shrinking a device.

Yeah...because it is a technological marvel to create a 7 inch tablet using today’s SoC's that already run circles around my first desktop. Maybe if apple does something to make it revolutionary thin like the iPhone5 is..wait..


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