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The HHVs have 35 percent greater fuel efficiency and 30 percent CO2 reduction compared to conventional diesel-powered vans

UPS made a green effort recently by adopting 40 new hydraulic hybrid vehicles (HHVs) to its fleet in two U.S. cities. 
 
The new HHVs, which are developed by Freightliner Custom Chassis Corporation (FCCC) and Parker Hannifin Corporation, will be deployed in Baltimore, Maryland and Atlanta, Georgia. Twenty vehicles will be sent to each city. 
 
The HHVs have 35 percent greater fuel efficiency and 30 percent CO2 reduction compared to conventional diesel-powered vans. The HHVs run on a fuel-efficient diesel combustion engine and an advanced series hydraulic hybrid. The action of braking creates energy, and this energy is stored in the hydraulic high-pressure accumulator. There is an option to turn off the engine and use the energy stored in the accumulator, which can lead to 90 minutes less of engine run time on a trip. 
 
 
"Our long-term goal is to minimize our dependence on foreign energy, and one way we will get there is through the deployment of a wide variety of technologies and designs in our fleet," said Mike Britt, UPS director of alternative fuel vehicle engineering. "As early adopters of this technology, we are very pleased with the significant fuel economy and emission reductions that come from the HHVs."
 
The deployment was partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program. UPS employees in Baltimore will receive their HHVs immediately while those in Atlanta will get their vans sometime before the end of 2012. 
 

Source: UPS



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Right...
By espaghetti on 10/3/2012 9:01:44 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Our long-term goal is to minimize our dependence on foreign energy, and one way we will get there is through the deployment of a wide variety of technologies and designs in our fleet

Another way would be to buy "energy" from domestic suppliers.
Oh wait...




RE: Right...
By bcwang on 10/3/2012 11:59:32 PM , Rating: 2
Except that you have to think of it as a global economy.

Even if we purchase soley from Canada and the United States it doesn't always drive the price of oil down, we are already mostly doing just that, reducing our overall consumption makes a much larger effect.

The point of getting away from "foreign" oil is moreso about getting less dependent on oil overall, making a massive impact on economies of countries that are less than friendly.

Atleast in theory it should drive prices down, but when was the last time oil prices followed anything that made sense. The amount of incidents where production that may be shut down by an event, only to not be affected(hurricanes that miss and so on), and then the price never drops back down after the fake event are staggering.


RE: Right...
By espaghetti on 10/5/2012 12:21:12 AM , Rating: 2
The context for my quote was
quote:
one way we will get there
..

I answered ..
quote:
Another way would be


I was simply offering "another way". As in they could maybe do both.


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