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Allen says people will get used to the changes

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen left the company in 1983 after being diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease. He has recently made comments about Windows 8 and believes that people will eventually learn to like the OS. However, he recently stated that Windows 8 was "puzzling" and "confusing initially." Allen made comments on a post this week made on his personal blog.
 
Allen says that he has been running Windows 8 Release Preview, which shipped back in May, on his desktop and on a Samsung 700T. That is the tablet that Microsoft is been handing out to developers, analysts, and some members of the press to get them to try out Windows 8.
 
"The bimodal user experience can introduce confusion, especially when two versions of the same application -- such as Internet Explorer -- can be opened and run simultaneously," Allen said.
 
The two user interfaces that Allen is talking about are the Windows 8 style, previously called Metro, offering a minimalist look and the classic view that looks like a slightly modified Windows 7 desktop. Allen also criticized some of the changes to the operating system that have been voiced by other users as well.
 
"Strangely, there is no way to set the desktop as your default view (there should be)," Allen wrote. "This is one of the single biggest changes in Windows 8: the lack of the familiar Start menu."
 
"I found myself wishing that a Power tile was available on the Start screen to make these commands more accessible," Allen continued.
 
Ultimately, Allen says that even with the quirks of the new operating system that Windows 8 would be manageable by users. He also believes that Microsoft will address any issues with its next release. Some of the issues Allen mentions are reasons beleived to be contributing to the slow adoption of early versions of Windows 8.

Source: ComputerWorld



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RE: 2 Things
By Mint on 10/5/2012 9:56:01 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
For me (and MANY of us) productivity is being able to do a few things at once.
Win8 doesn't impede that in the slightest. You can have 2 monitors in Win8 running desktop with 20+ windows, and dual taskbars is very useful as well. A heavy multitasker like yourself will be feeling the benefits of that for 100x as much time as you'll be spending on the start page.

The notion that the start page "interrupts" you and makes you "leave" the destop is entirely psychological. When you click on the start menu in Win7, you're taking your attention away from apps well.

What is so critical about your peripheral vision for a couple seconds when launching apps that are used too rarely for you to pin them to the taskbar?

And you're accusing me of being obtuse?

When you decide that you want to launch an app, doesn't it make sense for an OS to focus on quickly launching that app? If an app is pinned to the Win 7 start menu or a recent item, or if you type a couple letters and the result you're looking for is among the top, then sure, Win7 will tie Win8 in finding/launching what you want. If not, then Win8 will likely get you going faster: More search results, more one-click items (and their 2D spatial organization), quick access menu, etc.


RE: 2 Things
By erple2 on 10/13/2012 2:36:02 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
When you click on the start menu in Win7,


Who the hell clicks on the start menu? Super-key and type. That was one of the greatest revolutions that has happened to the GUI in as long as I can remember. Ironic that using the keyboard makes so much more sense in a GUI than a slow, imprecise mouse...


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