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Allen says people will get used to the changes

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen left the company in 1983 after being diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease. He has recently made comments about Windows 8 and believes that people will eventually learn to like the OS. However, he recently stated that Windows 8 was "puzzling" and "confusing initially." Allen made comments on a post this week made on his personal blog.
 
Allen says that he has been running Windows 8 Release Preview, which shipped back in May, on his desktop and on a Samsung 700T. That is the tablet that Microsoft is been handing out to developers, analysts, and some members of the press to get them to try out Windows 8.
 
"The bimodal user experience can introduce confusion, especially when two versions of the same application -- such as Internet Explorer -- can be opened and run simultaneously," Allen said.
 
The two user interfaces that Allen is talking about are the Windows 8 style, previously called Metro, offering a minimalist look and the classic view that looks like a slightly modified Windows 7 desktop. Allen also criticized some of the changes to the operating system that have been voiced by other users as well.
 
"Strangely, there is no way to set the desktop as your default view (there should be)," Allen wrote. "This is one of the single biggest changes in Windows 8: the lack of the familiar Start menu."
 
"I found myself wishing that a Power tile was available on the Start screen to make these commands more accessible," Allen continued.
 
Ultimately, Allen says that even with the quirks of the new operating system that Windows 8 would be manageable by users. He also believes that Microsoft will address any issues with its next release. Some of the issues Allen mentions are reasons beleived to be contributing to the slow adoption of early versions of Windows 8.

Source: ComputerWorld



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Pretty Decent...
By RussDR on 10/3/2012 9:56:25 AM , Rating: 2
I have a relatively older system in respect to my internal components and driver support FOR those respective components. It was(is) an XP machine running a dual core processor at 2.0GHz with 2 GB's of ram. At first glance, things are running smoother than my XP setup. It's plenty snappy with an occasional snag here or there. I suppose it could be that I've been used to such an outdated OS that these little snags don't bother me, but I find the minimal spec requirements to be a major selling point. Besides the Start menu being transferred to the tile interface, it's all pretty easy to assimilate, in my opinion. The live tiles are an amazing addition and the ability to consolidate my social, productive(work), and personal communication into single live tiles is one of my favorite features. Biggest quam? Using the corner functions in a multi-display setup. You need a steadier hand, that's all. Another problem I have, and I guess i'll have to work around it, is that you don't have the close/minimize/maximize boxes. Maybe I haven't read up enough or looked thoroughly enough, but I guess you just don't typically close apps or programs? The only way I've found to close a program is to use the top left corner to open up the recent programs list, right click and hit close. I'm just so use to closing things when I'm done with them that it bothers me to switch through things the way I do without exiting. It's only my 3rd day on the RTM though... We'll see.




RE: Pretty Decent...
By Mr Perfect on 10/3/2012 11:11:59 AM , Rating: 2
I can't see an obvious way how to close metro apps either. I started off doing what you are, opening the running program list on the left and then closing them, but have simply switched to Alt+F4ing the damn things when done using them.

Does anyone know the proper way to close metro apps? Are we even supposed to close them? I suspect the new idea is to just constantly leave everything running and let the OS cache things out to disk when resources run low.


RE: Pretty Decent...
By RufusM on 10/3/2012 3:54:20 PM , Rating: 2
This is one of the many things that users need training on for Windows 8. Metro apps cannot be closed by the user. The user switches in and out of them and Windows decides when they actually need to be terminated based on computer resources. This is just like how iOS and Android operate in that the OS actually manages the termination of applications (for the most part) and you have to go into a task manager to kill the application manually if you want.


RE: Pretty Decent...
By Reclaimer77 on 10/3/2012 5:24:08 PM , Rating: 2
That..is...horrible.


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