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Jimihendrix-gate?  (Source: Gizmodo)
Purple haze all in my frame, iPhone 5 just don't seem the same...

“You’re holding it wrong”

It never ceases to amaze when manufacturers try to convince people that an issue with something they purchased is actually a “feature”. Apple has most recently tried to convince buyers of the iPhone 5 that the purple haze or ring around bright light sources is normal behavior.
 
An iPhone 5 owner named Matt Van Gastel had been speaking with Apple customer support about the purple flare problem with his iPhone 5. Gizmodo shows images highlighting the difference between photographs taken in the same setting using iPhone 5 compared to the iPhone 4. The purple haze around the sun is readily apparent in the iPhone 5 image, and the same purple discoloration shows up with any bright light source.
 
After going back and forth with Apple support, Van Gastel received an email back from Apple stating that their engineering team has found a solution to the problem. According to Apple, the solution is to "angle the camera away from the bright light source when taking pictures."
 
The email also went on to say that the purple flare noted in images provided to customer service is "normal behavior for the iPhone 5s camera."
 
Gizmodo reports that some photography experts believe that the purple flare problem is caused by the sapphire glass that covers the iPhone 5 camera sensor. 

Source: Gizmodo



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This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

By Tony Swash on 10/3/2012 10:47:54 AM , Rating: 1
Listening to a brood of iPhobes frothing up around an imaginary fault in an Apple product is never pleasant, it reminds one all too painfully of how many of one's fellow humans set out to make themselves deliberately more obtuse than they need be.

The final word on the iPhone 5 camera comes from the uber-site for camera reviews 'dpreview' who have just posted their detailed review of the iPhone 5 camera, which is here

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/6867454450/quick-...

It starts with this observation.
quote:
Apple might not have set out to make some of the most popular cameras on the planet with its iPhone range of smartphones, but that's exactly what has happened.


The whole review is worth a read but here are it's conclusion in their entirety.

quote:
As we mentioned in the introduction to this article, the iPhone in its various iterations, has become (quite unexpectedly) one of the most popular digital cameras ever invented. We've come a long way since the craptacular 2MP obscuroscopes offered by the early models, to the point where the iPhone 4S and iPhone 5 actually offer genuinely useful image quality that in favourable conditions, is hard to tell apart from the output from 'proper' cameras.

http://www.flickr.com/cameras/

This graph shows the most popular cameras used by customers of Flickr.com, one of the world's largest photo sharing websites. This graph is generated from Flickr's analysis of the device ID embedded in images that are uploaded to the site.
It's important to note that smartphones don't always identify themselves in the EXIF data of their photographs, so some smartphone models are no doubt under-represented in this graph (which Flickr freely admits) but the popularity of the iPhone 4 and 4S among photographers is undeniable. 

This is great news for people like us who write about digital photography, because it signals a paradigm shift. This doesn't happen often, and it's very exciting when it does. Already, we're seeing mainstream camera manufacturers scrabbling to add connectivity to their products, and it's not just desperation that's making them do it. If the iPhone, and devices like it, have had a transformative effect on the industry it's because they've had a transformative effect on peoples' expectations of cameras, and photography. And the industry is doing what it always does - moving to fulfill a need.
 
The iPhone 5 is a fine mobile device, with an excellent camera. In qualititative terms it's not the best camera out there, and nor is it the best camera on a smartphone (the Nokia 808 has that honor, for now) but it offers satisfying image quality, some neat functions like auto panorama and HDR mode, and - crucially - it is supremely easy to use. It isn't much better than the iPhone 4S, as far as its photographic performance is concerned, but it isn't any worse (notwithstanding a somewhat more noticeable propensity towards lens flare). When manufacturers employ pixel-binning to achieve higher ISO settings we don't normally celebrate the fact, but in the case of the iPhone 5, it gives you greater flexibility in poor light (i.e., you might actually get a picture now, where you just wouldn't with the iPhone 4S) and the drop in quality is unnoticeable when the images are used for sharing/web display. 

We'll be taking more pictures with the iPhone 5, and doing more testing in the coming weeks. Until then, we hope you enjoy this gallery of real-world samples.




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