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  (Source: venturebeat.files.wordpress.com)
The new bill notes that the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) has until January 1, 2015 to adopt the new regulations

We may not have flying cars yet, but the state of California is getting a taste of the future with a newly-signed bill for self-driving cars.

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. signed a bill to create safety standards for autonomous vehicles earlier this week after taking one for a test drive himself. The bill is Senate Bill 1298 by Senator Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), which states that self-driving cars can be used on public roads for testing purposes only as long as there is a licensed operator in the driver's seat to take over if needed.

"Autonomous vehicles are another example of how California's technological leadership is turning today's science fiction into tomorrow's reality," said Governor Brown. "This law will allow California's pioneering engineers to safely test and implement this amazing new technology."

Self-driving cars are being considered in an effort to cut highway fatalities, highway congestion and pollution. It also offers a new form of transportation for those with disabilities.

Governor Brown signed the bill at the Googleplex alongside Google executives. The tech giant recently announced that its self-driving cars had logged 300,000 accident-free miles during tests. Google plans to be at the forefront of the cutting-edge technology.

The new bill notes that the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) has until January 1, 2015 to adopt the new regulations.


Sources: CA.gov, CNN



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Problem
By Ammohunt on 9/27/2012 1:46:20 PM , Rating: 4
I still feel that this can eventually lead to a a "Government knows best" type of nannyism. If this ever catches on then i can see them making the argument that human controlled vehicles are the last remaining variable keeping the roads 100% safe. Which invariably leads to having our driving privileges revoked and at the same time our right to freely move around long distances in an unmonitored way. Just like the city of New York makes lifestyle decisions for its citizens by banning large soda drinks. Its a slow erosion of freedoms in the name of "safety" and another layer of control..again how do you boil a frog?




RE: Problem
By tayb on 9/27/2012 2:49:55 PM , Rating: 1
I think a world where cars drive themselves is extremely desirable but I don't think it will ever happen. I also don't think a car driving itself removes your freedom to move about the country in any way. Whether you can move without being monitored is irrelevant in my opinion because that is a valid concern with or without self driving cars.

Until you can completely remove the human element from driving automated cars will never truly work. No robot can account for the infinite stupidity of a human being. It will probably need to be all or nothing and I just don't see that ever being practical. Sure, it works in isolated cases but what happens when someone dies while riding in a self driving car? Even if the other driver was clearly at fault people will get upset.

I'm fine with losing driving privileges. It's not a right, just a privilege. It's a mode of transportation to get you from point A to point B. If you want to drive there will be places to drive but not on public roads (there are plenty of private roads already). Removing drivers would have unbelievably positive impacts on the economy. The amount of time and money people spend/lose while sitting in traffic is incredible.

According to a 2007 Time's study Americans spend nearly 4.2 billion hours in traffic annually which amounts to approximately $87.2 billion or $750 per traveler per year. That's some serious added purchasing power for each individual.

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,190...


RE: Problem
By Rukkian on 9/27/2012 3:38:59 PM , Rating: 1
I am not sure why it would need to be all or nothing. So far the 300k miles driven without incident (of which many were in traffic) shows that we can have both. While it is not fool proof, I think that the computer can calculate what other drivers may do, and since they can see 360deg, would probably be better than alot of humans at anticipating what other idjits will do.

I think that, if done right, this could have a huge impact on safety of highways as well as dropping traffic jams.

I would love to have the option to have an automated vehicle for my 60m commutes each day, then be able to drive when I feel like it as well.

I do not support mandating autonomous vehicles, and don't think it could ever get passed (at least in my lifetime).


RE: Problem
By Ammohunt on 9/27/2012 4:24:46 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
I do not support mandating autonomous vehicles, and don't think it could ever get passed (at least in my lifetime).


I thought the same about Government Health Care...


RE: Problem
By diggernash on 9/27/2012 6:13:51 PM , Rating: 2
The glaring difference between the ideology of self versus the ideology of the hive in this post makes me increasingly depressed about our future as a species. I'm just waiting on the Mongol horde to show up at our doorstep and teach us about the weakness of civility.

I also pity the makers of athletic cups, as shown there will be no market for them.


RE: Problem
By MadMan007 on 9/30/2012 10:24:23 AM , Rating: 2
Unless you're over 47 years old, 'Government Health Care' in the U.S. has existed for your entire life.


RE: Problem
By Reclaimer77 on 9/27/2012 7:38:17 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I'm fine with losing driving privileges. It's not a right, just a privilege.


What a shock that you would say this...


"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere." -- Isaac Asimov

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