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Key navigation, messaging, and call handling functions remain non-working

When rumors began to fly back in late 2011 about a Google Inc. (GOOGwearable computer, skepticism was strong.  Then in mid-February of this year, more details trickled out on Oakley-esque Google glasses.  At that point it seemed clear Google was working on something, but whether the consumer would ever see it was a compelling question. After all there's been plenty of unrealized, much-hyped product prototypes, such as the infamous Apple, Inc. (AAPLLCD TV.  

I. Glass Explorer Prototype is Far From Finished

But Google differentiated its prototype from the vaporware crowd, surprising developers with Glass Explorer -- beta hardware of the glasses -- priced at $1,500.  (Ironically the Glass Explorer has now glass -- where the lens typical is, is mostly empty space, with the image being projected into the user's eye.

Now The Wall Street Journal has taken the pioneering product for a spin, and offered up some scarce details on the product, which still at least several months away from shipping to developers.

Spencer E. Ante of The WSJ reports that the product is missing many key features, writing:

When I asked to use the navigation feature that would show me maps of places I want to go, Mr. Brin said it is prototyped but not in the version he showed me. The calling and messaging capability that would allow me to phone someone one or see and respond to a text message also wasn't functional.
 
Google Glass
[Image Source: YouTube]

The author was also less than enthused about the $1,500 price point -- a bit high even for the developer crowd.  He also says that the glasses in their current form are missing a "killer app" and are "great", but not "ambitious enough".

II. Wearing Your Computer

But he praised the sleek, chic design of the glasses.  And he writes that what functionality that was working -- the voice activated (or auto-set) camera and video -- were exciting, making the glasses a bit "like a wearable smartphone".    He writes, "I could see their long-term potential."

That's what Google co-founder and tech pioneer Sergey Brin is hoping.

He remarks in the interview, "I never think about taking out my phone [when I'm wearing my glasses].  That would really be disruptive to my playtime [with my children].  I have always disliked the feeling that with technology I am spending a lot of my time and attention managing it.  The notion of seamlessly having access to your digital world without disrupting the real world is very important."

Sergey Brin Glass Explorer
Sergey Brin, wearing a Glass Explorer prototype [Image Source: Thomas Hawk/Flickr]

He adds, "We definitely like to make things open but right now we are working hard and fast to make something reliable we can get in the hands of users and developers.  I expect lots and lots of people will be using technology like this in years to come."

So amidst would-be competitors like Valve Corp. fielding wearable augmented reality "goggles" of their own, Google's product remains ambitious and a bit ahead of the pack -- although also most definitely incomplete.

Source: WSJ



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As a man...
By MrBlastman on 9/12/2012 2:59:27 PM , Rating: 0
quote:
I have always disliked the feeling that with technology I am spending a lot of my time and attention managing it. The notion of seamlessly having access to your digital world without disrupting the real world is very important."


I know the above is impossible. Men aren't wired to do multiple things simultaneously--at least the men I know. To borrow another's term, we work with "one drawer open" at a time. To move to the next drawer, we have to close the first one. It goes deep, far into the inner workings of our brains.

Women view this as a limitation. It drives my wife nuts that I must first complete the thing I am working on before I'll divert my attention to the next, second, third, fifth or twentieth thing she tries and interrupt me with while I'm working on something. I view this as an asset. Because men are able to focus on one thing/concept/idea at a time, they can filter out emotion and engage logic directly while applying it to their focus.

Women, on the other hand, are constantly surveying a million things at once, or so is the impression I get from them. I don't know for sure--I'm a man, I'll never know. But, from what I can gather through conversations with my wife and other women, this is what goes on in their heads all the time. They juggle thoughts dealing with kids, money, work, family, chores, wants, needs and more simultaneously, bouncing from one to another. The closest contrast I can find to my own mind is how frequently men think about sex (which is a lot). Unfortunately, it isn't even close to a perfect representation because, well, when men do think about it, they drop what they are currently doing momentarily. Women can somehow manage to do it all without seemingly missing a step (other than the logical one as emotion overrides it).

So, when I read statements like the above musing that we might be able to integrate the digital world with the real world sans interruption... it makes me chuckle. If you're a woman, yes, maybe so. If you're a man--I don't think it is going to happen anytime soon; that is, until we engineer a better brain.

Besides, aren't men the ones getting yelled at all the time for being on that "darn PDA?" It seems like it. ;)

These glasses are neat and they have some definite possibilities. You can't get over human limitations though.




RE: As a man...
By Boze on 9/12/2012 6:07:22 PM , Rating: 3
Speak for yourself, I'm having a Knights Corner processor embedded in my brain later this year.

They can rebuild me. They have the technology. They have the capability to make the world's first bionic man. Better than I was before. Better, stronger, faster.


RE: As a man...
By mindless1 on 9/13/2012 1:54:11 PM , Rating: 2
Can't really agree with that stereotype, I know plenty of men who can multitask and women with one track minds (and vice versa).


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation














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