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Print 19 comment(s) - last by dani31.. on Sep 12 at 7:49 AM

New app is Google's answer to the loss of native iOS support

In early August, Apple announced that it would be discontinuing native support for YouTube with the launch of iOS 6. Instead of going through an app, users will now have to view YouTube videos using the included Safari web browsers.
 
With iPhone users losing access to the native app, Google has announced the launch of the new YouTube app for the iPhone and the iPod Touch. The video streaming company also says that a version for the iPad will be coming later. No further details are offered on an iPad version of the official YouTube app.
 
The YouTube app was built by Google engineers with the promise of giving iPhone and iPod touch users the best mobile experience possible. The app will give users access to tens of thousands of videos from professional music videos to user made content YouTube is famous for. The app also has a new YouTube channel guide.
 
By swiping a finger on the left edge of the screen, the channel guide will open allowing access to all your subscribed channels on YouTube. The app also has a new search tool that gives suggestions while you type and makes it easy to sort through videos or channels. The search also allows users to sort through related videos, comments, and additional information while watching video.
 
The YouTube app also has more ways to share the videos you find including support for Google+, Facebook, twitter, e-mail, and text messaging and the app. The new YouTube app is available for download on the App Store right now.

Source: YouTube



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Someone tell me...
By Motoman on 9/11/2012 11:22:43 AM , Rating: 1
...why the f%ck you need an "app" for something that you just access online anyway, like FB or Youtube.

It's like people who freak out when the battery in their car remote dies, wailing about how they can't get in their car now. Take the f%cking key and unlock the f%cking door, moron.




RE: Someone tell me...
By StuckMojo on 9/11/2012 11:27:39 AM , Rating: 3
Because YouTube uses flash?


RE: Someone tell me...
By Motoman on 9/11/2012 11:37:16 AM , Rating: 2
...then how do they make it work at all on iOS?


RE: Someone tell me...
By dani31 on 9/11/2012 11:51:57 AM , Rating: 2
Youtube uses flash to display the video. Flash is the player, not the video. The actual stream is encoded using H.264 which is natively supported by iOS.

It's good to have the option not to have the youtube app installed.


RE: Someone tell me...
By Motoman on 9/11/2012 12:13:10 PM , Rating: 2
Thanks for that...so back to the original question: why do you need an app for it?

Browser...go.


RE: Someone tell me...
By Motoman on 9/11/2012 12:14:19 PM , Rating: 3
Which, by the way, is why it's equally stupid for Steve Jobs to say something like "people who want porn can buy another phone" and then decline to have any porn apps in the app store.

Browser...go.


RE: Someone tell me...
By TakinYourPoints on 9/11/2012 12:31:40 PM , Rating: 2
Because a native mobile app is way faster than doing the same on a browser


RE: Someone tell me...
By V-Money on 9/11/2012 1:10:21 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Because a native mobile app is way faster than doing the same on a browser


That isn't the case anymore,didn't your hear? You can get chrome on ios now ;-)


RE: Someone tell me...
By dani31 on 9/12/2012 7:49:22 AM , Rating: 2
Chrome on iOS is just a Safari skin. The difference is limited to the UI, everything else is placebo.


RE: Someone tell me...
By Tony Swash on 9/11/2012 2:21:37 PM , Rating: 1
This decision I am sure was mutual. Google wants to increase ad density in all it's offering and Apple would not support inclusion of Google ads in an Apple Youtube app so Google has to step in with one of their own that does include ads.

Google doesn't just want to increase ad density - it has to increase ad density. The emerging weaknesses in Google's current core business strategy are significant but are currently somewhat obscured by rising revenues. The most important number in Google's recent quarter was revenue-per-click which was down a whopping 16% year on year. The previous quarter it was down 12% year on year. The one before that down 8%. Dollars-per-click is essentially the price of an ad. However Google's ad revenues were up, they managed that feat by packing search results pages with many more money making ads. The volume of clicks have increased but the earned revenue from each click is deteriorating. You can see the evolution of Googles ad density by looking at a typical search page comparison from 2008 and 2012.

http://www.businessinsider.com/google-has-taken-ov...

Obviously Google cannot continue packing more ads into search pages and into apps and may already be hitting the limits of that strategy. If revenues per click continues the decline shown in the last three quarters, even if the decline slows, then Google will feel the impact financially. Add that to the continuing problem Google faces in earning revenue from ads on mobile devices, which is a problem that the very expensive Android strategy has utterly failed to solve, and Google has some significant pressures on their core business model. It will be interesting how they respond. This is an interesting development.

http://www.mondaynote.com/2012/09/09/googles-amazi...

There seems to be a steady drift away from internet access via the desktop and towards access via mobile devices. Nobody seems to be able to earn much from mobile advertising. If you are Apple that makes a tiny part of your business portfolio less profitable, if you are Google that makes your core business less profitable. Google will haver to respond somehow.


RE: Someone tell me...
By InternetGeek on 9/11/2012 7:58:00 PM , Rating: 2
I'm not sure how declining revenues would be an issue as long as the business is maximizing profit and the profit stays strong. Unless, you are implying that declining revenue is because Google is losing customers, which shouldn't be surprising as the marketing industry transitions into digital and the economy bites.

The issue of advertising being the core of Google business is not new. However, they are expanding into other areas, for example App Engine, search (they still their Google box), etc. While I would agree this is too small, they do have the resources to invest and derive revenue from these new operations. It's a marathon not a race.

I'm not sure how Android would solve an ad revenue problem unless Google gave it the ability to drop in on your conversations with an "hey, here's an app for that!" ad. The ad revenue problem should be solved by the ad business, also with some help from the Play business, i.e.: Quality free aps, easier integration, etc.


RE: Someone tell me...
By InternetGeek on 9/11/2012 8:07:29 PM , Rating: 2
Sorry, I should have added the following.

While I could agree the decision to split up was mutual, I think this is a case of Apple letting Google stand on its own. So far, Google has been riding freely on iOS by leveraging Apple. In that sense, I like Microsoft's strategy better of offering their services in the different stores. Apple wouldn't let you do that.


RE: Someone tell me...
By xti on 9/12/2012 12:48:36 AM , Rating: 2
keys? where are you...mexico?


RE: Someone tell me...
By nocturne_81 on 9/12/2012 3:03:05 AM , Rating: 2
You have to understand that most 'apps' are already just wrappers for displaying web content.

Flash is an issue of course, though youtube is designed to automatically display video in HTML5 when used from a browser without flash support.

The advantage is the fact that an app offers most of the 'interface' content locally on the device, eliminating the need to load static content like images and stylesheets over and over again -- giving you better performance and less bandwidth usage.


Google's answer
By smackababy on 9/11/2012 10:08:55 AM , Rating: 4
is releasing an App with ads... Just what I always wanted. I might stick with viewing videos in Safari.




RE: Google's answer
By LordSojar on 9/11/2012 10:11:08 AM , Rating: 2
Have fun with that. Google's ads aren't intrusive at all. Safari, being the giant flaming piece of [explicit language removed] that it is, meh, you have fun with that. Mobile Chrome + HTML5 YouTube = much better.


Other Way Around ?
By Shadowself on 9/11/2012 10:24:20 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
With iPhone users losing access to the native app, Google has announced the launch of the new YouTube app for the iPhone and the iPod Touch.


This strongly suggests that Apple dropped YouTube first then Google responded. In less than a month? I doubt it.

I suspect Google wanted to change the app to include ads. Apple didn't like that Google didn't use iAds and had ads financially supporting Google and not Apple in the standard, minimum set of apps on iOS 6. Thus Apple gave YouTube the boot. Then Google decided to finish the new app and ship it.

Nobody really wins or loses here, but it does go to point out just one more situation where Apple and Google are no longer friends.




RE: Other Way Around ?
By DFranch on 9/11/2012 11:22:28 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
This strongly suggests that Apple dropped YouTube first then Google responded. In less than a month? I doubt it.

I suspect Google wanted to change the app to include ads. Apple didn't like that Google didn't use iAds and had ads financially supporting Google and not Apple in the standard, minimum set of apps on iOS 6. Thus Apple gave YouTube the boot. Then Google decided to finish the new app and ship it.


Or, since they already had the YouTube app which has been included in ios since forever, it didn't take them too long to come up with an app.

Or Google has known for months that they were getting the boot, and had plenty of time to come up with an app.

Lots of possible reasons. What we know for fact is Apple is aggressively removing Google from ios. You have nothing but speculation about ads or the time frame involved.


By CZroe on 9/11/2012 11:20:46 AM , Rating: 2
But can I finally respond to specific comments? Probably not, if I still can't even on Android. :(




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