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Print 56 comment(s) - last by Clauzii.. on Jun 14 at 9:27 PM

64GB flash discs will be available in PATA and SATA flavors

We are finally starting to see some real technological breakthroughs in the area of mobile storage after a long period of stagnation. 2004 saw the rise of speedy 7200RPM hard drives while this year saw the introduction of perpendicular recording which allows data to be recorded in a smaller area. Just yesterday, DailyTech reported on Seagate's hybrid solution which pairs a traditional hard drive with perpendicular recording technology to 256MB of non-volatile flash for better performance, increased battery life and faster booting in Windows Vista.

Today, PQI is showing off new drives that mimic Samsung's 32GB Flash-SSD.  PQI, with the help of Samsung NAND flash memory chips, has new 64GB IDE and 64GB SATA 2.5" storage solutions for mobile users. The drives, which are due for release in August, are by nature more rugged, lighter, cooler and more efficient than traditional hard drives with a spinning disc. And best of all, there are absolutely no moving part so no more listening to your hard drive whir while you’re typing away and no more clicking and thrashing as you open up Photoshop or perform other disk-intensive operations.

Pricing has not been announced on the new 64GB IDE and SATA 2.5" drives, but rest assured that the new drives will be many times more expensive than even the fastest 7200RPM hard drives on the market today. As the market matures and more players enter the fray, we are sure to see a steady fall in prices. In fact, Samsung predicts that the global market for NAND flash based drives will increase from $540M USD in 2006 to over $4.5 billion USD in 2010. With growth like that, there will always be a premium for NAND-based disks over traditional hard drives, but the price differential should be much more manageable than it is today.



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Prizeless!!
By Clauzii on 6/10/2006 7:30:27 PM , Rating: 2
When this hits market, for me as a musician it will be a new dawn. Storage for Samplers, Synthesizers etc. will be rugged enough that even a drop on the stage does nothing to the storage. And for the Studio PC, total silence is a step closer, leaving the CPU to a slow fan. Passive PSU, HDs, GPUs - and I'll guess the CPU can be passive too, given the right design...

Almost at any price this will be a must for me.

Even @ 4-500 each.




RE: Prizeless!!
By Clauzii on 6/10/2006 7:38:32 PM , Rating: 2
Btw.:

Only thing missing is the 3D-PolyAcrylic Storage Lazer R/W Data Block instead of ALL noisy optical discs!

The only thing left ticking in the PC will be the ultrafast moving mirrors for focusing/positioning the lazer.


RE: Prizeless!!
By mindless1 on 6/13/2006 9:12:32 AM , Rating: 2
Actually if you are still waiting you probably won't jump on this either. TODAY you can in fact use Compact Flash with CF-IDE adapters and have 4-8GB per card (in the more economical sizes or more if you want to pay a premium), as well as LAN (NAS) storage for anything more on a studio PC. Is 4GB enough for most users? No if you're running semi-modern apps, but it's not like you have to have it all on one card either, just as with mechanical HDD you would have higher performance through subdivision of cards to different I/O streams.

Total silence was already obtainable if it were only the flash HDD holding you back.


RE: Prizeless!!
By Clauzii on 6/14/2006 9:27:57 PM , Rating: 2
My demand in storage on one device is like >40GB..

As for the total silence - it should be possible using a passive PSU, and some custom CPU-cooler then - given some cabinet construction with some kind of metal mesh on the bottom and top areas iow. convection cooling :)


"What would I do? I'd shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders." -- Michael Dell, after being asked what to do with Apple Computer in 1997














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