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  (Source: TheNextWeb)
It will hire the extra 1,000 employees throughout 2012

Microsoft is planning to employ 1,000 more workers in China this year in an effort to reach the full potential of that market. 
 
Microsoft already has 4,500 employees in China, but will add another 1,000 throughout 2012 for research and development (R&D), services, marketing and sales. About 600 people will be employed in the new cloud computing center in Shanghai as well.
 
This move is likely a result of recent troubles Microsoft has had with China. In January, the tech giant sued Gome Electrical Appliances Holding for installing pirated versions of its software on computers. Piracy is a common issue in China, and aside from that, Microsoft also wants to appeal to public institutions and local governments to address regulation problems in the country
 
The ultimate goal is to increase China research and development spending by 15 percent throughout late 2012/early 2013. Microsoft currently spends $500 million per year on the area. 
 
With Windows 8's release just around the corner, Microsoft is likely looking to boost sales of its new operating system in more markets -- and prevent piracy. China is also a market that the iPad has been successful with, and Microsoft probably wants to see the same with its mobile devices, like the Surface tablet, as well. Microsoft needs to play a bit of "catch up," since it didn't test the Chinese smartphone market until just this year -- far behind others like Apple and Android. 

Source: Reuters



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RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By hood6558 on 9/6/2012 5:26:57 PM , Rating: 0
China is the new U.S., wide open with opportunity, corruption, manufacturing, pirating, no regulations, sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll (like America in the 50's and 60's). I hope they enjoy it while they can, before the "Chinese Dream" devolves into a struggle for daily survival (like America now). If I could speak Chinese I'd move there tomorrow. I miss those days when life was simple(r)and the bankers hadn't yet had time to completely loot the country. If we don't get our act together we'll be a footnote in history a hundred years from now. Why bother hiding our aggressive policies behind a load of crap about "making the world safe for freedom and democracy. China certainly won't bother with spouting ideology when they overrun our borders looking for more real estate and let the Triads take over. So order your copy of Rosetta Stone now and practice your Mandarin, Cantonese, and some of the lesser dialects, before it's too late!


RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By FITCamaro on 9/6/2012 5:51:28 PM , Rating: 4
You say that until you're thrown to the sidewalk by police for spitting. Or realize you can't get to the whole internet. Or are choking for breath from the pollution.


By semiconshawn on 9/6/2012 6:30:17 PM , Rating: 3
The internet is funny. You can hand pick your own reality. Its the roaring 50's in China right now, just minus the freedom and prosperity.


By wordsworm on 9/6/2012 11:45:55 PM , Rating: 1
If you want to get rid of the pollution, you'll need to send some pot smoking hippies, liberals, and environmentalists.


RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By slunkius on 9/7/12, Rating: -1
By FITCamaro on 9/7/2012 7:00:52 AM , Rating: 3
And that's why you don't think for yourself.

I have no problem with air quality measures. I have a problem with the EPA. Because the federal government has no authority to create it and spend money on it. States are capable of instituting their own air quality measures. And if the states wanted the federal government to handle it, they could pass a Constitutional amendment to give the federal government the power to do that. And only that.


By BifurcatedBoat on 9/7/2012 11:50:44 PM , Rating: 2
Think of capitalism as a football game, and the government as the referee. If the ref doesn't throw a flag when players attempt to hurt each other, it's going to devolve into a game of blood.

"Market forces" aren't going to fix a problem like pollution, because my own individual pollution only affects me (and everyone else) just a little, but the cost savings in not having to deal with it properly benefits me significantly. So of course I'm going to keep on polluting.

Similarly, if the people who buy my products don't live near me, then they don't care whether I'm stinking up the place somewhere else.


By Samus on 9/7/2012 2:01:52 AM , Rating: 2
Hood, it's damn near treasonous to refer to current China as "like America during the 50's and 60's" because they have none of our freedoms, specifically freedom of speech, collective bargaining, right to firearms/self defense, and their government is far more corrupt and dilluted than ours ever could be and most importantly they have absolutely no middle class, which is a requirement because the middle class defines that "simple" lifestyle you want so much.

sigh. God bless America.


RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By semiconshawn on 9/6/2012 6:06:43 PM , Rating: 2
Look. The economy is not doing well but the U.S. is hardly sruggle for daily survival for the giant majority. Now flip that and see that it is a huge daily struggle for a billion chinese who make $10 a month. Im not arguing that we dont need some major changes right here but having been to China and Taiwan quite a few times I can tell you the average American is living quite large compared to the average Chinese citizen. The Chinese Dream? Yeah. Get out and see the world before you act like you know about it.


RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By dark matter on 9/6/2012 7:47:47 PM , Rating: 2
It's not a struggle because you're all living on debt.

You know what a man with a trillion dollars in their account that they've borrowed.

A very poor man indeed.


RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By semiconshawn on 9/6/2012 8:48:51 PM , Rating: 2
Wow. Way to not really prove any particular point.


RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By Samus on 9/7/2012 2:05:11 AM , Rating: 2
When you owe the bank $100,000 dollars, you have a problem.

When you owe the bank $10,000,000,000,000, the bank (China) has a problem.


RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By TSS on 9/7/2012 6:37:05 AM , Rating: 2
If you're lending $3,6 billion a day and suddenly, nobody is willing to fund you anymore because you don't pay back debts,

You've got a much, much bigger problem.

Also, the chinese haven't bought treasuries since march. They're not stupid, they no longer trust the US. I fully expect them to use it as a buffer for stimulating their economy because even china is slowing down. Considering the EU and US can no longer afford stimulus, it should be much more effective in china, especially since redeeming treasuries will depress the US further and eliminate a competitor if they want to create a middle class. And no, they won't stimulate exports, they will stimulate domestic demand.

The japanese have. Which is logical when you consider the Yen has dropped from 114 to 78 in 4 years. US debt got a whole lot cheaper for them especially since they're expecting (or hoping) the yen to weaken in the future. Their holdings in treasuries are now on par with those of the chinese.

And ofcourse, the Fed. Who can create money out of thin air. And is a *Private* entity with (non-disclosed) shareholders. And currently has $2 trillion worth of US debt.

Let us not forget that your number is wrong as well, there's about $5 trillion in federal debt (don't know about lower levels of government) that's held by foreigners, china and japan each have roughly $1 trillion. The other $11 trillion is owned by the public, various banks, pension funds, the social security fund (also filled with $2,6 trillion worth of treasuries) and whatnot.

So, if you default on your debt, China loses $1 trillion, and US balance sheets lose $11 trillion.

Also, jumping back to the Yen again, the japanese economy has only deflated by 2,5% in 4 years. So that means that the US dollar has been inflated by about 30% in 4 years to make up for the difference in conversion rate, which sounds about right. Take a look at this:
http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/M2/

Well whatta ya know, a ~30% increase in 4 years, what a coincidence!

Remind me, Who has the problem again?


By semiconshawn on 9/7/2012 11:23:54 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Remind me, Who has the problem again?


The average Chinese worker.

Ranting about nation scale economics doesn't change that one bit.


By Samus on 9/8/2012 2:12:48 AM , Rating: 2
Christ TSS way to read between the lines, can you take a joke ;)


By StevoLincolnite on 9/7/2012 1:57:20 AM , Rating: 2
Plus, the United States has what, 300 million people?
It's not going to disappear, it will stick around, much like the British after world war 2 when they started decolonizing.

At worst, the USA just won't be on top of the country food chain, big woop.


RE: At first I was like, "Hell yea!"...
By MadMan007 on 9/6/2012 8:55:43 PM , Rating: 2
I take it you mean the 18 -50's and -60's?


By inighthawki on 9/6/2012 9:54:00 PM , Rating: 2
Why would you think he meant that? That makes no sense.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation














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