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2014 Honda Accord PHEV
Honda's Accord doesn't get class-leading fuel economy, but it's pretty darn close

Honda has revealed the specifications for its all-new 2013 Accord, which features a brand new lineup of "Earth Dreams" engines. The next generation Accord also features fresh styling inside and out and plenty of standard equipment, which marks a vast departure from Honda's typically stingy behavior when it comes to base vehicles.
 
When it comes to powertrains, the highlight is Honda's new 2.4-liter direct injected, four-cylinder engine that generates 185hp. When paired with a 6-speed manual transmission, it's rated at 24 mpg city and 34 mpg highway (28 mpg combined). However, opting for Honda's all-new continuously variable transmission (CVT) bumps those numbers to 27 city and 36 mpg highway (30 mpg combined).
 
While those numbers are quite good for a midsizer, they still don't quite match the numbers laid down by the 2013 Nissan Altima (27 mpg city/38 mpg highway).

 
The company's 3.5-liter V6 has also been revised to deliver 21 mpg city and 34 mpg highway (25 mpg combined). 
 
Other changes tucked away include a switch to electric power steering to improve fuel efficiency and a switch to a MacPherson-strut front suspension instead of the double wishbone design that has been a hallmark of the Accord. Honda claims that the move to struts improves ride/handling while also reducing interior noise levels.

 2013 Honda Accord Sport

As previously mentioned, base Hondas are typically very spartan machines with few amenities. However, Honda is changing that with the new Accord by including Bluetooth, USB/iPod integration, and a rear-view camera. However, we feel that the last inclusion is more likely due to the government's regulations on rear sight lines than its generosity.
 
Optional equipment that will be available on the 2013 Accord include Smart Entry & Push Button Start, Honda LaneWatch Blind Spot Display, Forward Collision Warning, Lane Departure Warning, Adaptive Cruise Control, and LED projector headlights.

 
On one final note, Honda also released a bit of information on the Accord plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). The Accord PHEV features a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine which uses the Atkinson cycle. It generates 137hp and is paired with a 124 kW electric motor (total system power is 196hp) and a 6.7 kWh lithium-ion battery pack. Honda says that the Accord PHEV can travel 10 to 15 miles with a fully charged battery before the gasoline engine has to kick in. Maximum driving range is listed at 500 miles. 

We've also got a few pictures of the Accord PHEV. Let’s just say that it looks… interesting to put it nicely.




2014 Honda Accord PHEV

Sources: Honda, Wall Street Journal



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Cost cutting
By Masospaghetti on 9/5/2012 9:06:36 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The company's 3.5-liter V6 has also been revised to deliver 21 mpg city and 34 mpg highway (25 mpg combined)


Are you sure the highway number is correct? 34 MPG is way higher than anything else in the segment and the combined number doesn't seem to match the given city/highway pair.

Also, I highly doubt Honda switched to MacPherson struts to "improve ride/handling". It's well established that the double wishbone setup is superior in suspension geometry. Struts, by design, cause a change in camber as the suspension is loaded and unloaded. This is almost certainly just cost-cutting since most folks who buy Accords aren't running them through the slalom.




RE: Cost cutting
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 9/5/2012 9:17:44 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, the V6 highway numbers/combined numbers are correct.
Yes, moving to struts is a cost-saving move. Did you really expect Honda to say that though? ;)


RE: Cost cutting
By robertisaar on 9/5/2012 9:48:30 AM , Rating: 2
interesting that the 2.4 and 3.5 are matched in highway economy then...

and that they're only 2MPG under the CVT.

not that i see myself in a honda anytime soon, but in this instance, why go with the significant power hit and choose anything other than the 3.5?


RE: Cost cutting
By steven975 on 9/5/2012 11:22:10 AM , Rating: 2
I think the 3.5L has cylinder de-activation now.

They had that in the Hybrid V6 model a while ago. A derivation of VTEC actually worked to keep the valves shut, cutting pumping losses when a cylinder bank was shut down.


RE: Cost cutting
By Jeffk464 on 9/5/2012 8:00:46 PM , Rating: 3
Because the vast majority of cars see most of their miles driven in the city.


RE: Cost cutting
By freedom4556 on 9/19/2012 10:29:35 AM , Rating: 2
I don't think that's really true for more than a simple majority of people. The EPA uses a 55/45 percent city/highway split when doing the combined mileage, and do you really think they pulled that number out of their collective asses? I personally put almost all my miles on my car on the highway, and I only commute 25 miles to work one way each day. However, you'd probably be closer to right if you said most cars spend most of their time running in the city.


RE: Cost cutting
By Reclaimer77 on 9/5/2012 1:36:27 PM , Rating: 2
RE: Cost cutting
By Jeffk464 on 9/5/2012 7:54:14 PM , Rating: 2
Yup, pretty big downgrade going to struts. Pretty much the rest of the industry is on struts though Honda was a hold out and will probably put the accord in Camry class handling.


RE: Cost cutting
By tng1 on 9/9/2012 10:50:35 PM , Rating: 3
Honda has developed a new welding technique. They are welding steel and aluminum for the front subframe. They make the claim of the new technique quoted as "It also enabled a change in the structure of the subframe and the mounting point of suspension, which increased the rigidity of the mounting point by 20% and also contributed to the vehicle’s dynamic performance."
<http://world.honda.com/news/2012/4120906Weld-Toget...
I wonder if this allows the safety of the car to exceed what is possible compared with the double wishbone.
Honda claimed safety reasons when Honda did away with double wishbone on the Civic.


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