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Print 15 comment(s) - last by gentryfunk.. on Jan 16 at 6:47 PM

Nikon says goodbye to the market it helped to popularize

In a little more than ten years after its first baby steps into the digital age, Nikon's efforts have nearly put the final nail in the coffin for its film cameras. The company has decided to abandon its roots in the film camera industry and move full steam ahead with its ever expanding lineup of digital camera products.  The company is also seeing rising demand for digital SLR cameras as traditional film and P&S digital camera owners decide to upgrade.  Digital cameras now make up for 95% of Nikon's total camera sales. 

However, all is not lost for the hardcore Nikon film camera fans out there. According to Nikon, they will still manufacture the F6 (professiona) and FM10 (amateur) as well as the manual focus 85mm f/2.8D PC Micro-Nikkor lenses.  Support for these products will continue for ten years after Nikon's last date of sale.



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You should buy what you need...
By TigerKR on 1/14/2006 10:00:11 AM , Rating: 3
Using the standard of 300 dpi (that's what actual photo labs use to print their prints, regardless of whether the origin is digital or film - yes, all film is scanned digitally at 300 dpi before it is printed), here's what you need, depending on your desired output:

2x3 in 0.54 mp
3x4 in 1.08 mp
4x5 in 1.8 mp
4x6 in 2.16 mp
6x8 in 4.32 mp
8x10 in 7.2 mp
6x9 in 4.86 mp
9x12 in 9.72 mp
12x15 in 16.2 mp
8x12 in 8.64 mp
12x16 in 17.28 mp
16x20 in 28.8 mp
10x15 in 13.5 mp
15x20 in 27 mp
20x25 in 45 mp
12x18 in 19.44 mp
18x24 in 38.88 mp
24x30 in 64.8 mp
14x21 in 26.46 mp
21x28 in 52.92 mp
28x35 in 88.2 mp
16x24 in 34.56 mp
24x32 in 69.12 mp
32x40 in 115.2 mp
18x27 in 43.74 mp
27x36 in 87.48 mp
36x45 in 145.8 mp
20x30 in 54 mp
30x40 in 108 mp
40x50 in 180 mp

But wait! What if you want to crop your pictures before printing? Well, then you need to start with a larger image. Probably 2x larger, so that way you can crop up to 50% and still get the desired output size print.

If you can't think of why you'd ever need to crop 50% of an image, take into consideration that most point-and-shoot digital cameras have a limited 3x zoom. With a 16 MP camera and a 3x zoom, you can crop to 50% and still get an 8x10 print (that gives you an effective 6x zoom).

In terms of the megapixel count of film, here's some reading:

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"The theoretical peak resolution of fine-grained 35mm film is, indeed, something like 50 megapixels, as shown by internationally recognised authority me in this diagram. That's right at the bleeding edge, though. In the real world, even very serious 35mm photographers have a hard time beating 25-megapixel-equivalent quality - you can use a fabulously expensive scanner at outrageous resolution to make much bigger files from 35mm, but all they give you is a larger view of the grain and the blur. So I think it's perfectly fair to say that a truly excellently sharp picture on 35mm film is about 25MP-equivalent."

http://www.dansdata.com/20d_res.htm

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"In the figures below, the derived digital megapixel equivalent are fuzzy numbers. For example, the Fujichrome Velvia 35mm equivalent is 10 to 16 megapixels. The 10 and 16 are soft. By soft I mean by several megapixels, like 10 meaning 8 to 12, and 16 meaning 14 to 18. You can see what I mean by trying to compare some of my test images yourself."

http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/film.vs.dig...

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"Still, there is no question that conventional film is able to produce sharper images and more detail. Simply put, the more pixels you have, the higher the resolution and the better the image quality. High-end consumer digital cameras still only capture five to six million pixels. Although the resolution of a piece of film is harder to quantify, it's closer to 20 million pixels!"

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/framed.htm?pa...




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