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Print 33 comment(s) - last by tastyratz.. on Aug 28 at 2:47 PM

1TB Revo Drive Hybrid drops to $159.99

OCZ is slashing prices on its 1TB Revo Drive Hybrid, and Amazon is the first retailer to go live with the new pricing. Amazon is listing the drive at $159.99 versus an MSRP of $495.00. The previous low for the drive was $199 a little over a week ago.
 
The Revo Drive Hybrid features a PCI-E interface and combines 128GB of MLC flash with a 1TB HDD. It offers read speeds of up to 910 MB/sec and write speeds of up to 810 MB/sec.

 
Tiger Direct and Newegg are expected to match Amazon's pricing within the next few hours if you have a preference for those retailers.

You can read a review of the drive from Hot Hardware.


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SSDs obsolete by the week
By Beenthere on 8/25/2012 7:11:25 PM , Rating: 4
With the immature SSD tech and makers coming up with all sorts of bastardized versions every few weeks, this market is destine to have a lot of product carnage and unhappy campers as most of this crap is rushed to market without proper validation and it shows with the massive reliability, compatibility, firmware updates, RMAs and lost data issues.




RE: SSDs obsolete by the week
By Meaker10 on 8/25/2012 8:39:42 PM , Rating: 3
You are living in a dream world.

If you go for some of the more consumer crud then sure, but if you stick with the likes of the crucial M4 or Intel then they are far more reliable than mech drives.


RE: SSDs obsolete by the week
By Alexvrb on 8/25/2012 9:38:30 PM , Rating: 4
The same could be said for hard drives. If you stick to enterprise hard drives they're pretty damn reliable too, even under heavy workloads and 24/7 operation.

You're living in a dream world if you don't acknowledge that there have been a lot of trash SSDs out there with boatloads of issues. Since they tended to be the more affordable models, they ended up in the hands of a lot of consumers that just don't know any better. Or someone who wanted an SSD but didn't have the cash for a highend model. Not everyone is a tech junky or rich (or both). Thankfully most of these issues are behind us, and you can get some decent entry level units.

I'd add Samsung 830 to the list of good, but increasingly affordable SSDs.


RE: SSDs obsolete by the week
By Reclaimer77 on 8/26/2012 4:35:19 AM , Rating: 5
This thread seems more appropriate for something written two years ago. I'm kind of shocked to see such outdated thinking getting uprated this far into the SSD era of computing.

quote:
You're living in a dream world if you don't acknowledge that there have been a lot of trash SSDs out there with boatloads of issues.


And yet as mature as the technology is, this can still be said about certain hard drives. Go check Newegg as a quick reference. Bunches of cheap hard drives that ship DOA or fail shortly after purchase.

quote:
If you stick to enterprise hard drives they're pretty damn reliable too, even under heavy workloads and 24/7 operation.


Yeeeah well if we were all running file servers out of our homes, that would be something to look into for sure.


RE: SSDs obsolete by the week
By Alexvrb on 8/26/2012 6:20:07 PM , Rating: 3
You skimmed a bit. I said "have been", past tense. I also said that most of these issues are in the past. I was pointing out that cheap means cheap whether talking about SSDs or HDDs. He was saying that you should just stick only to premium SSDs. That doesn't always happen, whether through lack of funds, ignorance, OEM preinstalled, or whatever. He also implied that HDDs are unreliable. Well if you stick only to premium HDDs too, there are quite a few reliable models out there. He was generalizing too much.

The fact is there were a lot of people affected by shoddy controllers, firmware, etc, and it wasn't that long ago. Some of these problematic drives are still selling pretty well. Furthermore, high-capacity low-price drives are going to continue to assault the market using cheap flash (possibly including TLC). So I suspect we'll need to continue to avoid suggesting "SSD" blindly without specifying models. I also praised the Samsung 830 series in addition to the aforementioned M4 and most modern Intel SSDs.

Enterprise drives were an example of how a "mech drive" can be plenty reliable even under heavy nonstop use. I've had a lot of non-enterprise drives hold up quite well too over the years. But for the record, there are affordable SATA-based enterprise drives. For example: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N8...

Some people need capacity for secondary storage or other uses such as for backups, video surveillance, in a home server (including more than just a dumb file server, might also include centralized automated backup and easy restoration of multiple local boxes). The aforementioned enterprise drive would be great for that, it's built for reliability and has a 5 year warranty.

I don't dislike SSDs, quite the contrary. I dislike cheap or unproven models, and I dislike people assuming all SSDs are more reliable than HDDs.


By HoosierEngineer5 on 8/26/2012 8:21:47 PM , Rating: 2
As far as I can tell from the manufacturer's documentation, the difference between an enterprise hard drive and a standard one is burn-in. Burn-in should be able to eliminate infant mortality, but I have never seen a claim that it would increase reliability. What have you seen?

Are there differences in the materials used, or the design?


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