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The Ram 1500 gets a much needed heart transplant

Ford isn't the only company that can dish out full-size pickups with relatively decent fuel economy these days. Ford made headlines two year ago (and saw sales of V6 engines skyrocket) when it introduced an all-new 3.7-liter V6 engine and 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6 for its best-selling F-150.
 
Not one to let Ford sit around and bask in the media and sales spotlight, Chrysler is giving its 2013 Ram 1500 a heart transplant as well. In this case, instead of the tired old 3.7-liter V6 that has soldiered on as the base engine in the Ram 1500 for far too long, it has been replaced by Chrysler's corporate V6: the 3.6-liter Pentastar.
 
Whereas the old 3.7-liter engine produced 215hp and 235 lb-ft of torque, the Pentastar V6 blows those numbers out of the water with 305hp and 269 lb-ft of torque. For comparison, Ford's based 3.7-liter V6 engine in the F-150 generates 300hp and 275 lb-ft of torque.


3.6-liter Pentastar V6
 
Despite the massive increase in power and torque, fuel economy has also gone up significantly with the new Pentastar V6. Fuel economy numbers increase from 14/20 (city/highway) with the old 3.7 to 18/25 with the new 3.6 in 4x2 trim (these figures are also ahead of the 3.7-liter V6 in the Ford F-150 which is rated at 17/23).
 
It also helps that the '13 Ram 1500 makes use of a new 8-speed automatic transmission to help boost fuel efficiency.
 
Even though the V6 doesn't have as much "grunt" as the Hemi V8 option, Inside Line says that the Ram 1500's new base engine is enough to propel the pickup to 60 mph in just 7.5 seconds.


2013 Dodge Ram 1500
 
All of this newfangled technology doesn't come for free, however. The '13 Ram 1500 with the Pentastar V6 and 8-speed automatic transmission starts at $23,585 compared to $22,420 for the '12 Ram 1500 with the 3.7-liter V6 and 4-speed automatic transmission.
 
With both Ford and Chrysler stepping up to the plate with power and efficiency for the full-size pickups, all eyes should now be on General Motors and its Silverado 1500/Sierra 1500.

Sources: Chrysler, Inside Line



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You gotta ask yourself
By YashBudini on 8/24/2012 6:41:55 PM , Rating: 2
1.What's the engine spinning doing 65mph down the highway?

2. How many gears will it downshift towing a max capacity load up a steep incline. Or even empty for that matter.




RE: You gotta ask yourself
By jeffkro on 8/25/2012 3:13:59 AM , Rating: 2
If programmed well it will down shift the correct amount of gears.


RE: You gotta ask yourself
By jeffkro on 8/25/2012 3:22:26 AM , Rating: 2
I drive a tractor trailer and can tell you when towing heavy loads more gears are better then less gears.


RE: You gotta ask yourself
By YashBudini on 8/25/2012 11:27:20 AM , Rating: 2
More gears in a tractor trailer are designed for extreme use and very heavy loads. These qualities don't necessarily need to translate into a car or truck transmission.

What's the red-line in your vehicle? Are all they extra gears there simply for economy but for necessity? IE how fast could your vehicle go with 20% fewer gears? And your extra gears are there also for another necessity, you need the absolute lowest fuel costs just to stay in business.

What you're saying is correct in general, it's just not the whole picture. And also
quote:
more gears are better then less gears.

Until they break, much more likely in the article vehicle than yours.


RE: You gotta ask yourself
By Beenthere on 8/26/2012 11:23:57 AM , Rating: 2
Modern transmissions rarely "break gears" so reliability isn't an issue per se, especially in pass cars.

More gears allows the trans to operate as a reliable CVT that can handle high torque and loads that a conventional CVT can not. By keeping the revs low and the engine at the peak torque all the time, you get optimum mpg and performance regardless of the vehicle velocity. Being able to change engine speed in small increments keeps the engine in it's fuel efficiency window far more than is possible with fewer gears.

Obviously there can be a slight increase in parasitic losses and cost associated with more gears in pass car applications but they are always offset by better mpg and performance under the current economic conditions which are likely to continue to get worse with time as the oil industry Cabal cashes in to record profits year-after-year, even with lower sales volume..


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