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Event data recorder (EDR) or "black box"  (Source: carseek.com)
The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers wanted to push the setting of black box standards to September 2013

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) declined the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers' request to delay set standards for "black boxes" in vehicles.
 
The black boxes, called event data recorders (EDRs), are used in autos to record the last moments before an accident to identify its cause. Automakers have been using them for awhile now, but the NHTSA's new standards, which are to be set September 1, could force auto companies to replace their current EDRs for more expensive ones. 
 
The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, which represents automakers like Detroit's Big Three, wanted to delay the setting of EDR standards to September 2013. The group said automakers with older EDRs can meet the new regulations by disabling these older versions, but only as long as the new rules set standards for the devices -- not mandate them. 
 
The NHTSA rejected the request in an eight-page letter, saying that it has already cooked up some ways to help automakers comply without having to spend extra money. Besides, the new standards have already been delayed several times since the rules were finalized in August 2006. 
 
"The agency has made it a priority to work toward a proposed standard that would mandate these devices on all passenger vehicles on the nation's roadways," said Lynda Tran, NHTSA spokeswoman. "NHTSA remains committed to proposing a standard in the coming months that will help save lives by ensuring both automakers and the agency have the necessary data to make continued improvements in vehicle safety."
 
According to NHTSA, EDRs are already in 91.6 percent of vehicles today, and it would only cost about $24.4 million to boost this number to 100 percent. This is based on the sale of 15.5 million light vehicles annually. 
 
Back in April, the U.S. Senate passed a bill called the "Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act," also called "MAP21." The bill aimed to place EDRs in all 2015 model year vehicles, but also had a bit of a downside -- the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) could strip Americans of their passports if they owed enough tax money. 
 

 

Source: The Detroit News



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RE: Interesting
By Nfarce on 8/15/2012 11:16:03 AM , Rating: 0
We currently have accident investigators that use those little orange spray cans to mark skid mark points, where key debris landed, and and other things. There is nothing wrong with that in accident re-creation. Don't forget the ubiquitous witnesses that will most likely see the wreck (I've seen countless in front of me and even beside me).

And auto accidents are not as complicated as aircraft accidents obviously. Even though the FAA and NTSB have black boxes to work with, they still use field investigators at accident sites to find the smallest detail a black box won't provide. Like a crack in the fan blade of the #2 engine in that United DC-10 that blew up and severed all hydraulic lines in the tail causing that horrendous crash landing in Sioux City, Iowa. Also keep in mind that that the black boxes in aircraft also record CVR data (cockpit voice recorder) which also give clues.

So, point being, I don't want a black box in my new car that only provides basic limited data when the current resources previously mentioned work just fine. Let alone yet ANOTHER government-mandated expense (and weight) to add to the price of new vehicles.


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