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Infographic explaining cyber crime and security  (Source: Rasmussen College)
Governments and police authorities are scrambling to try and catch up to global demand of stolen information from cyber criminals

Growing up in the United States, children are continually warned about potential “real-world” crime that plagues only a small number of the population each year. However, more people are now becoming victims of cyber crimes, and there is very little being done to help protect Internet users – and companies routinely targeted.

Increasingly, the looming threat of cyber crime is hitting us at a rapid pace –researchers estimate organized crime groups collected more than $388 billion from identity theft and other crimes in 2011. Amazingly, cyber crimes are quickly approaching the $411 billion industry involving the trafficking and selling of illegal narcotics, according to Rasmussen College researchers.

Criminals are developing their cyber crime skills that include phishing, internet scams, identity theft, and other sophisticated attempts to steal personal information.

For internet users looking to protect themselves, researchers have a few basic tips: not using a single password for all online accounts, avoid clicking unsafe links, connecting to secure Wi-Fi accounts, keep security software updated, and be careful about what you’re posting on the Internet.

That’s all fine and dandy for casual Internet users, but what if the problem is a structural issue from corporations and the government?

The U.S. government is now making its own cyber security a more pressing matter, though very few people seem to know what to do.

Senators Jay Rockefeller (D-W. Va) and Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.), the Senate Homeland Security Committee Chairman, believe the Pres. Obama administration should utilize an executive order for cyber security. Lieberman and Rockefeller haven’t had success with efforts in Washington because certain industries aren’t happy they’d be forced to adhere to stricter digital standards.

Obama is interested in seeking longer prison sentences for digital criminals, and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has a cyber operation plan to standardize military cyber operations.

Even with all of this talk regarding U.S. vulnerabilities, the U.S. government has found success launching coordinated attacks. In addition to temporarily crippling Al Qaeda, the U.S. has used Stuxnet and Flame to target Iranian computer networks.

In the long term, government legislation will not help protect the US government – and its citizens – from cyber attacks, but elected officials trying to ignore the problem won’t do any good.

Source: Venture Beat



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Business Exposure
By dsx724 on 8/14/2012 11:18:33 AM , Rating: 2
One of the largest problems your hear on the news as well as in my job is the exchange of information between companies. If one of the partners that you're doing business with doesn't have adequate security (usually the case if your business is small or their business is small), your consciousness doesn't translate into overall security of information.

The increase prison time is not going to make a difference because there too much money to be made. It's like treating the symptoms than to address the real issue of corporate responsibility.




"This is about the Internet.  Everything on the Internet is encrypted. This is not a BlackBerry-only issue. If they can't deal with the Internet, they should shut it off." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis














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