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Official launch of Software titles on September 5

Valve is a major video game company and has very impressive titles to its name, including Half Life. Valve also has a popular digital distribution platform called Steam that has been used to distribute digital versions of retail video games.
 
Valve has now announced that the first set of non-gaming software titles are heading to Steam. Software titles would be things other than video games. According to Valve, the software titles that will be landing on Steam will range from creativity to productivity.
 
"The 40 million gamers frequenting Steam are interested in more than playing games," said Mark Richardson at Valve. "They have told us they would like to have more of their software on Steam, so this expansion is in response to those customer requests."
 
The new software will be able to use some interesting features Steamworks offers such as easy installation, automatic updates, and the ability to save work to a Steam Cloud space so that files are available wherever you go. Steam will add more software titles as time goes by. The company also says developers can submit software titles via Steam Greenlight.
 
The official launch of software titles on Steam will be September 5.
 
Valve President Gabe Newell recently focused his wrath on Windows 8. Newell noted last month that Windows 8 would be a "catastrophe" for the PC space. He also predicted that some PC makers might leave the PC industry. Microsoft certainly made some of its biggest partners very uncomfortable when it entered the hardware business with the Surface tablets. 

Source: Valve



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By JasonMick (blog) on 8/9/2012 1:08:04 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I wouldn't be too sure about that. Microsoft is turning into a "Me too, Apple" more and more every day.
How so? Microsoft was selling smartphones and tablets, with its OEM partners, long before the iPad or iPhone were a twinkle in Steve Jobs' eye.
quote:
Because by all indications Windows 8 for the PC is shaping up to be a massive flop. There's still opportunity for Steam here for sure.
Wow, you're really on to something there.

That must be why BUILD 2012 sold out in an hour due to wild developer demand for Win8 apps and product.

That MUST BE why OEMs were stumbling over themselves to show off all sorts of slick Windows 8 devices at Computex.

And SURELY that is why the Windows 8 Release Preview reached 1 million downloads in under 24-hours...
http://www.redmondpie.com/download-windows-8-relea...

I mean don't those landmarks just scream "massive flop"?? I'm so glad you shared your kind wisdom with us.


By Reclaimer77 on 8/9/2012 1:19:07 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
How so? Microsoft was selling smartphones and tablets, with its OEM partners, long before the iPad or iPhone were a twinkle in Steve Jobs' eye.


That's not what I mean and you know it :) I'm talking about Microsoft blatantly looking to mimic Apples vertically integrated platform of tightly controlled "app stores" and in-house services bundled into the OS. And bringing this to the desktop.

quote:
Wow, you're really on to something there. That must be why BUILD 2012 sold out in an hour due to wild developer demand for Win8 apps and product. That MUST BE why OEMs were stumbling over themselves to show off all sorts of slick Windows 8 devices at Computex. And SURELY that is why the Windows 8 Release Preview reached 1 million downloads in under 24-hours... http://www.redmondpie.com/download-windows-8-relea... I mean don't those landmarks just scream "massive flop"??


Is this really Jason Mick? Just...wow. I think I just got trolled from a blogger on his own article. That tone coming from you is..unusual.

This evidence is thin and pretty obvious. Of course developers are going to download it! Of course it's going to be displayed by OEM's!

But for you to deny the extremely vocal majority who's clearly NOT enthused about Metro as a desktop UI? Come on man.

quote:
I'm so glad you shared your kind wisdom with us.


Wow, condescend much?

We're YOU the one who wrote the piece about a well respected Microsoft analyst calling Windows 8 "The new Windows Millennium"? I guess he was just being a "hater" too..


By JasonMick (blog) on 8/9/2012 1:40:14 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
But for you to deny the extremely vocal majority who's clearly NOT enthused about Metro as a desktop UI? Come on man.
"But for you to deny the extremely vocal minority who's clearly NOT enthused about Metro as a desktop UI? Come on man."

...there fixed that for you.

Sure Windows 8 and its Metro UI will not be pleasing to a majority of PC enthusiasts. They oft prefer barren interfaces, graphically minimalist interfaces, and the ability to fully customize everything themselves. However, these preferences run counter to the majority of users, and the enthusiast community is quite small compared to the overall base of phone, tablet, and computer users.

Hence the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, but the few like to cry foul that they're not getting their way.

Yes, I've reported on the criticism -- guilty as charged.

I won't deny they're entertaining. They're entertaining to me. They're clearly entertaining to my readers (inc. yourself) as you're reading and commenting on these posts.

But for the record as an analyst I think it's overstated and largely the result of misunderstanding and lack of experience with Windows 8. Similar criticism has been leveled against many past successful Windows OSes....

"Chicago Sun-Times : Want Windows 95? Skip the 1st Version?"
Author: Don Crabb
Date: July 9, 1995

"Windows 98 was not Worth the Wait"
Aug. 1998: Chicago Tribune: Jimmy Gutterman

"Yawns greet Windows XP debut"
Cape Cod Online - Nov. 2001
http://www.capecodonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article...

"Windows XP: Readers: It's not worth the trouble"
CNET - 2001
http://news.cnet.com/2009-1001-274436.html

...nay sayers have been bemoaning Microsoft's constant improvements to Windows and predicting its demise for almost two decades now.

And what has happened?


By Reclaimer77 on 8/9/2012 1:52:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Sure Windows 8 and its Metro UI will not be pleasing to a majority of PC enthusiasts. They oft prefer barren interfaces, graphically minimalist interfaces, and the ability to fully customize everything themselves. However, these preferences run counter to the majority of users, and the enthusiast community is quite small compared to the overall base of phone, tablet, and computer users.


Since when did MS catered to those people though? Look if you want something pretty and flashing and easy enough for a 4 year old to use, Apple is down the hall.

quote:
Hence the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, but the few like to cry foul that they're not getting their way.


It's more than that and you know it.

This is unlike any Windows OS before it, because Metro is there, and the desktop is still there. And we're expected to work within this Jeckll and Hyde mess of an OS with two conflicting UI designs that do NOT mesh well together. The experience is jarring, disjointed, and not intuitive. With apps working on one, programs working on another? Come on, admit it, that's a goddamn mess!!!

You want Metro? Fine. You should buy a touch device to get it. I represent the desktop users (who number in the millions) who want a better desktop experience and MORE features added to the Windows desktop. NOT to have Metro forced on us and actually LOSE things like the Start menu in exchange.


By JasonMick (blog) on 8/9/2012 2:03:11 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Since when did MS catered to those people though? Look if you want something pretty and flashing and easy enough for a 4 year old to use, Apple is down the hall.
Microsoft has always catered to them. Remember, when the Windows GUI was slocked on top of MS-DOS many power users felt it was a huge step backwards and emulation of Apple's 1984 MS-DOS.

Similar arguments were made back then -- Microsoft was turning its back on its true fans, while trying to copy Apple's mass market appeal.

In reality both companies are simply selling to the biggest market -- the masses, though Microsoft has tried to preserve a degree of customizability. I guarantee you, no matter how much you villainize Windows 8, it will be more flexible/customizable than the rigid confines of OS X.

quote:
It's more than that and you know it.

This is unlike any Windows OS before it, because Metro is there, and the desktop is still there.
But that's what critics like yourself aren't understanding.

Metro UI as it's applied in Windows 8 is just a graphical unwrapping of the Start Menu + widgets , both of which were present in Windows 7.

The graphical theme is revised, but this is not new content, for the most part. No functionality is gained or lost, either, for the most part on the desktop front, though the new UI due to its large tiles is more friendly for touch devices.

The desktop and Metro UI both serve their purposes, just as the desktop and the Start Menu served their purposes in Windows 7. I would argue that Metro UI is in fact a big upgrade of the start menu, both graphically and in terms of functionality.

And even if it's not your favorite, it's hard to fault Windows 8 for besting Windows 7 in memory usage, # of running processes, and processor consumption, while offering improved file exploration on the desktop, improved file transfers, and a host of other upgrades.


By Pirks on 8/9/2012 3:39:18 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
There should be a completely seamless interaction between Metro and the Desktop, across the board
There is one, when you get Win8 RTM and see how windows key works you'll stop trolling and lying.
quote:
I see no reason why Metro and Desktop apps, for the PC version of Windows 8, be incompatible with each other
That's because Metro is new touch friendly usaer interface framework with new visual style and new everything, it's like a new version of windows almost from scratch. And the older desktop apps are not touch friendly legacy mouse/kbd software straight from your beloved era of 1990s :P Of course software from circa 1990 will be incompatible with software written like 20-30 years later. No shit Sherlock!
quote:
throwing the PC and mobile OS together in a big jumbled mess
Nah, you'll learn it and you will stop trolling and lying I'm sure. I was also a bit scared after reading all these oldfag reviews but in real life usage scenarios RTM build is great. It's like seriously sped up (I mean SERIOUSLY) Windows 7 plus real good looking and much more usable full screen start menu plus a big bonus of metro apps that are touch friendly and a joy to use on any decent win8 tablet, like Surface. I mean they should have set higher price than $39.99, honestly. This upgrade is worth much more. Fortunately for them this is just a promotion for early adopters, they'll charge proper (full) price starting January 2013 ;)


By Reclaimer77 on 8/9/2012 4:56:47 PM , Rating: 2
I don't know of, or heard of, anyone who was asking for a "full screen start menu" in Windows. It's an absurd waste of screen real estate.

But that's just my opinion. I also respect yours, although I think it could do without the "oldf@g" monicker.

quote:
And the older desktop apps are not touch friendly legacy mouse/kbd software straight from your beloved era of 1990s :P


Well yes, that's what is most optimal for a desktop OS. Since most of us will not be using multi-touch LCD monitors for some time. If ever.

Again, I have no issue with Metro on touch devices. Forcing this environment onto the Desktop PC is where the problems arise.


By Pirks on 8/9/2012 5:08:04 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's an absurd waste of screen real estate
It's not a waste since it's always hidden when you need desktop. They just made this start menu much much bigger and loaded with useful functionality like live tiles. Otherwise it's all the same, same keyboard and same mouse interactions to bring it up. It feels very consistent with my previous Win7 experience, it's intuitive up to the point that I had nothing to learn to use it, left bottom corner as usual or windows key as usual. I feel at home right away with this new interface, because it uses old desktop paradigm extensively (corner or windows key, to be exact)
quote:
Forcing this environment onto the Desktop PC
I don't feel it forced on me even a little bit since I always can use all my desktop apps and games and such. If start menu turned into beautiful and useful start screen - this is a good change overall. Making it touch friendly to boot adds a nice bonus too, which doesn't matter for non-touch desktop but still is a good decision IMHO.


By JasonMick (blog) on 8/9/2012 1:44:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
That's not what I mean and you know it :) I'm talking about Microsoft blatantly looking to mimic Apples vertically integrated platform of tightly controlled "app stores" and in-house services bundled into the OS. And bringing this to the desktop.
P.S. Microsoft isn't exactly mimicking Apple here, alone. Linux, RIM, Verizon, and others had app stores long before Apple's iTunes App Store.

Were they as successful? No, of course not.

But to say "Microsoft is copying Apple" even solely on the basis of its adoption of an app-distribution ecosystem is silly given the amount of predecessors to Apple's App Store. The idea of an App Store is an inherently intuitive one for an internet-connected era. Microsoft is simply making the obvious choice.

And I meant no offense to you personally, sorry if I hurt your feelings -- I appreciate you reading and commenting.

I just feel you're wrong on this one, and I figured I'd point out some of the signs of strong support for Windows 8. You can feel free to post counter-evidence if you have any -- it's a free country.


By 91TTZ on 8/9/2012 3:03:46 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Microsoft isn't exactly mimicking Apple here, alone. Linux, RIM, Verizon, and others had app stores long before Apple's iTunes App Store. Were they as successful? No, of course not. But to say "Microsoft is copying Apple" even solely on the basis of its adoption of an app-distribution ecosystem is silly given the amount of predecessors to Apple's App Store.


I disagree. What separates Apple from its competitors is its execution, not necessarily its ideas. Plenty of companies have come up with innovative ideas and failed to bring the product to market properly, only to have Apple succeed in doing it.

Did Apple have the first mp3 player? Nope. But the iPod was a successful product whereas other companies failed to compete.

Did Apple have the first smartphone? Nope, but the iPhone was also a successful product whereas other companies couldn't really make inroads into the consumer space.

Did Apple have the first tablet device? Nope, but the iPad was a successful product while other tablets never really caught on.

Microsoft has resorted to mimicking Apple's execution and it's obvious.


By TakinYourPoints on 8/11/2012 7:21:25 PM , Rating: 2
^^^ Gets it


By Azethoth on 8/10/2012 2:36:07 PM , Rating: 2
Credit for the first functioning App Store like thing goes to Blizzard North who made Diablo and Diablo II. Yes, you could only update Blizzard games but it was automatic and painless over the internets, back in 1996 or so.

It took forever for anyone else to match that.

As for Verizon etc. having App Stores. What a joke. It was not until the iPhone that you could move your data with you to your new phone. Thats right, I am specifically ignoring the third party apps that sometimes did that in the early 2000's if you prayed right and had the right phone model version and serial number because those were goddamned lame and suitable for technically literate people at best.


By GenZ on 8/12/2012 10:33:02 AM , Rating: 2
Blizzard's App updater is different from an App Store. Its elementary, if you can't buy, then its not a store.

quote:
Thats right, I am specifically ignoring the third party apps that sometimes did that in the early 2000's if you prayed right and had the right phone model version and serial number because those were goddamned lame and suitable for technically literate people at best


I can see what happened as you wrote that post, you were about to write just 'right phone model', then you realised that the iPhone only works with other iPhones. So you tried to add the words 'version' and 'serial number' to make yourself right. Don't worry, this is the basis of every 'Apple is better' argument out there.

You always pick the things Apple is good at in order to win an argument, because they are never consistently good at anything... except innovation, which by definition is the rebranding and packaging of other peoples things. In other words, stealing ideas.

You also state you are technically illiterate in the last sentence, as it quite plainly seems from your tone that the constraints mentioned are not suitable to you. Perhaps in the future you should work on your 'literacy' before sharing it with us.


By TakinYourPoints on 8/9/2012 7:22:10 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I'm talking about Microsoft blatantly looking to mimic Apples vertically integrated platform of tightly controlled "app stores" and in-house services bundled into the OS. And bringing this to the desktop.


Microsoft has been doing vertically integrated systems with internal app stores for longer than Apple has, given that the XBox is several years older than the iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad.

This is nothing new for them.


By Pirks on 8/9/2012 1:24:59 PM , Rating: 1
Ya I also laughed hard reading this Reclaimer's troll post, especially after using Win8 RTM build on my Vaio. He's just a clueless idiot who has no real experience using Win8. I think the upgrade price of $39.99 is a steal for such a huge upgrade in usability. I dunno man, this is first time ever I see MS seriously going to pwn Apple in usability department. This is huge deal man, but slowpokes like Reclaimer will see it only after many years, as usual.


By Reclaimer77 on 8/9/2012 1:30:29 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
I think the upgrade price of $39.99 is a steal for such a huge upgrade in usability.


Windows 8! So good, we're giving it away.

quote:
I dunno man, this is first time ever I see MS seriously going to pwn Apple in usability department.


Since when was Microsoft competing against Apple in the usability of desktop OS's? They won that battle a decade ago.

Windows 8, specifically Metro, is only more "usable" on a touch screen device.


By Pirks on 8/9/2012 3:48:02 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Since when was Microsoft competing against Apple in the usability of desktop OS's?
Since the moment Apple pwned MS in usability of a touch driven OS


By 91TTZ on 8/9/2012 3:10:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Ya I also laughed hard reading this Reclaimer's troll post, especially after using Win8 RTM build on my Vaio. He's just a clueless idiot who has no real experience using Win8. I think the upgrade price of $39.99 is a steal for such a huge upgrade in usability


There isn't a huge upgrade in usability for desktop users and Microsoft knows that. They know that this is suboptimal for desktops and another step towards tablets/phones. That's why they're stilling it for less than half the price of their previous desktop operating systems.

They see mobile as the future so they're basically subsidizing the cost of this in the hopes that it will lead to increased sales of Microsoft's mobile offerings. They're trying to transition their desktop users to a (Microsoft branded) mobile-centric world where they see more profits.


By 91TTZ on 8/9/2012 2:28:00 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And SURELY that is why the Windows 8 Release Preview reached 1 million downloads in under 24-hours... http://www.redmondpie.com/download-windows-8-relea...


There was a lot of enthusiasm for Windows Vista also. Windows Vista beta was downloaded over 5 million times.

Then...

"In its first year of availability, PC World rated it as the biggest tech disappointment of 2007,[109] and it was rated by InfoWorld as No. 2 of Tech's all-time 25 flops.


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