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The iOS simulator for iOS 6 shows that a 4-inch screen and 640x1136 resolution makes the most sense for the next iPhone

A new report from 9 to 5 Mac provides further evidence that Apple's next-generation iPhone will have a few screen changes, such as size and resolution.

As we near the next-generation iPhone's announcement on September 12, more and more rumors are making their way around as far as specs go. It is to have a slightly updated design with a screen that measures 3.999 inches diagonally (which is about 30 percent larger than the current iPhone 4S), a smaller dock connector (as opposed to the usual 30-pin), a relocated headphone jack, centered camera, and a unibody casing with metal backplates.

While some of these specs are still up in the air awaiting confirmation, 9 To 5 Mac may have figured out some truth to the screen-related rumors. Using the iOS simulator application in the iOS development tools, 9 To 5 Mac created a few different scenarios that compared iOS 5.1 and iOS 6.

What it found was that the iOS 6 version was fitted for larger displays (meaning the new 3.999-inch screen rather than the standard 3.5-inch screen for the current iPhone). IOS 6 is scalable to a longer display, even showing five full rows of apps per screen while the current iPhone only has four rows.

In addition, 9 to 5 Mac applied a 640x1136 resolution to the iOS 6 display using the iOS simulator, and found that this was the only resolution that fit perfectly with the screen size. Other resolutions made the screen's apps look like the iPad's layout, which is not typical of the iPhone.

While 9 to 5 Mac isn't 100 percent that Apple will go with this screen size and resolution, the evidence is stacking up that this may be the case. I guess we'll find out come September. 

Source: 9 to 5 Mac



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RE: So Innovative!
By WalksTheWalk on 8/9/2012 8:52:14 AM , Rating: 2
Having used an iPhone 4S (work) and T-Mobile Galaxy S2 (personal) for the past 6 months, I can say I strongly prefer the Galaxy S2's 4.5in. SAMOLED+ screen over the iPhone 4S (3.5in. SLCD2). The noticeable resolution differences are nominal and the SAMOLED+ screen's contrast and color saturation is tremendous over the SLCD2. The SLCD2 is marginally better for text, but that's about it.

It will help that the iPhone 5 is moving to a 4in. screen and I'm interested in seeing the new super thin LCD technology that it's reported to have. I won't be buying one because of Apple patent trolling, but I want to see what the tech looks like.


RE: So Innovative!
By Guspaz on 8/9/2012 11:40:08 AM , Rating: 2
I'm admittedly comparing with similar phones, but I can't stand the insane oversaturated colour (resulting from an excessively wide colour gamut) on modern Android phones like the Galaxy Nexus or SGS2. This isn't a factor of the technology, as far as I can tell, but a conscious choice on the part of the phone manufacturer.

As it stands, I would never buy any phone using an OLED screen with such a gamut.


RE: So Innovative!
By Reclaimer77 on 8/9/2012 11:49:29 AM , Rating: 3
There absolutely is a technical reason for the vibrant color gamut. It's due to the insanely superior contrast ratio SAMOLED+ has over the competition. It's not "over saturated" though.


RE: So Innovative!
By WalksTheWalk on 8/9/2012 5:29:51 PM , Rating: 2
On my SGS2, the official ICS update from Samsung toned down color profile a bit so it wasn't quite as saturated for reds and greens as the Gingerbread profile was. I wouldn't call it over-saturated but it's a matter of personal opinion. The color now very closely matches my plasma TV at home, which is fully calibrated.


“So far we have not seen a single Android device that does not infringe on our patents." -- Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith














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