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Print 13 comment(s) - last by raghwenda123.. on Aug 4 at 8:52 AM

Memory features 140 MB/s reads, 50 MB/s writes

Today even budget personal computer (PC) solid state drives (SSDs) offer read speeds of up to 230 MB/s and write speeds of up to 190 MB/s.  Top-of-the-line models can record speeds of up to 492MB/sec for sequential reads and 518MB/sec for sequential writes.

But the NAND memory used in tablets and smartphones has been stuck in the slow lane, largely due to power and space (form factor) constraints.  That's why the new Samsung Embedded Multimedia Card (eMMC) Pro Class 1500 is an exciting development, despite speeds that would seem pedestrian by PC standards.

Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. (KSC:005930) is building the new NAND memory on its proprietary 20 nm process node.  It just began "volume production" of 16-, 32- and 64-gigabyte (GB) density modules for "smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices."

Samsung smartphone NAND

The eMMC modules off sequential reads of 140 MB/s and sequential writes of up to 50 MB/s.  For random reads/writes it can handle 3500/1500 IOPS (inputs and outputs per second), which Samsung claims is four times as fast as previous solutions.

The modules use 2, 4, and 8 8-gigabyte dies stacked on top of each other.  The package is extremely compact -- even the 8-die package is only 1.2 mm thick and weighs a mere 0.6 grams.

Samsung NAND

Samsung fills in some technical details, writing:

Samsung eMMC Pro Class 1500 is the first to support the latest JEDEC e-MMC v4.5 specification that standardizes more features to improve performance, efficiency, security, and reliability such as: a SDR-200 Interface (200MHz, 200MB/s Max Bandwidth), cache handling, dynamic handling, file sanitizing, and power-off notification.

The new NAND are the first major refresh to Samsung's storage line since it introduced "64GB eMMC in January of 2010 using 30nm-class 32Gb NAND flash components."

Ironically some of these metaphorically hot new chips may wind up in arch-rival Apple, Inc.'s (AAPL) new iPhones and iPads, despite the fact that Apple is trying to sue Samsung's popular, industry-leading smartphones off the market.

In a recent interview Samsung product chief Kevin Packingham bemoaned this relationship, commenting, "[At] times... I’m absolutely appalled that we sell what I consider to be the most innovative, most secret parts... of our products to... Apple [or anybody]."

But he said that the chip-making unit tells him, "Look, that’s none of your business. You go make your mobile phones and if you’d like to use our components, that’d be great."

Source: Samsung



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RE: It's true
By retrospooty on 8/2/2012 11:04:04 AM , Rating: 2
I am no Apple fan, but they do a great job with product design and they do force the competitors to raise their games. We all benefit from that. Where would Windows be without Mac as a viable alternative? Win XP that is where.

We all benefit from Apple's push to higher res screens. They didnt invent the screens, nor the idea of high res, but someone there at Apple decided to put it in the products and for that we thank you Apple. For their hypocritical lawsuits we think they suck. For Copying others tech and suing when your tech is copied we call BS, but for advancing platforms, they get credit.


RE: It's true
By inighthawki on 8/2/2012 11:13:54 AM , Rating: 2
I'm not sure I agree with your Windows XP comment. Microsoft started development of Vista/Longhorn and even launched Vista before OSX was really much of a threat at all. If you mentioned innovation that resulted from iOS/iPhone/iPad, then I would agree with you, however. On release those devices were quite impressive, and definitely pushed the competition to produce some quality phones (and tbh I feel that a lot of them still have trouble doing that...) and soon tablets.


RE: It's true
By retrospooty on 8/2/2012 11:31:29 AM , Rating: 2
"Im not sure I agree with your Windows XP comment. Microsoft started development of Vista/Longhorn and even launched Vista before OSX was really much of a threat at all. "

Mac was never a "treat" and still isnt. But without a viable alternative, MS wouldnt be pushing it at all, they would be milking it. That was my only point.

" If you mentioned innovation that resulted from iOS/iPhone/iPad, then I would agree with you, however. On release those devices were quite impressive, and definitely pushed the competition to produce some quality phones"

Absolutely. When the iPhone was released it was by far the best smartphone out there. I would even say at the time IOS and its multitouch UI was defintely a great innovation. They made every other smartphone maker raise their games, big time.


RE: It's true
By Taft12 on 8/2/2012 4:01:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Microsoft started development of Vista/Longhorn and even launched Vista before OSX was really much of a threat at all.


I think you proved his point. Vista took MS over 5 years, delayed many times and had many features cut (and it STILL sucked). There's your product of a lack of competition was.

Same goes for Internet Explorer. Stagnation until Firefox started growing a userbase.


RE: It's true
By inighthawki on 8/2/2012 9:35:52 PM , Rating: 2
Vista actually took a long time because they had to rewrite a large chunk of the codebase due to various reasons, but necessarily because they took their time. In addition, Vista didn't really suck, the drivers for Vista sucked.

Most of the crashes in the OS were video driver issues by nvidia, ati, and intel (http://www.engadget.com/2008/03/27/nvidia-drivers-...

In addition, the shitty performance was mostly due to selling hardware underrated for the complexity of the OS. In fact, Windows 7 is almost identical to Vista under the hood with a few improvements, but nobody complains about that do they? Probably because the lowest end desktop CPU you can buy these days will pretty much chug anything you want it to do.


RE: It's true
By inighthawki on 8/2/2012 10:56:44 PM , Rating: 2
Two small fixes - sorry
1- It decided to combine my ending ). into the URL, so here it is again with an actual working link:
http://www.engadget.com/2008/03/27/nvidia-drivers-...

2)- It should read "but not necessarily because they took their time"


RE: It's true
By TakinYourPoints on 8/3/2012 1:27:22 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I'm not sure I agree with your Windows XP comment. Microsoft started development of Vista/Longhorn and even launched Vista before OSX was really much of a threat at all. If you mentioned innovation that resulted from iOS/iPhone/iPad, then I would agree with you, however.


Jim Allchin, Microsoft executive and head of Windows at the time, wrote this memo to Gates and Ballmer in 2004 following Macworld: http://www.microsoft-watch.com/content/operating_s...

A snip of what he had to say:

quote:
I would buy a Mac today if I was not working at Microsoft. If you run the equivalent of VPC on a MAC you get access to basically all Windows application software (although not the hardware). Apple did not lose their way. You must watch this new video below. I know this doesn’t show anything for businesses, but my point is about the philosophy that Apple uses. They think scenario. They think simple. They think fast. I know there is nothing hugely deep in this.

http://www.apple.com/ilife/video/ilife04_32C.html [Note: link no longer works]

I must tell you everything in my soul tells me that we should do what I called plan (b) yesterday We need a simple fast storage system. LH is a pig and I don’t see any solution to this problem. If we are to rise to the challenge of Linux and Apple, we need to start taking the lessons of “scenario, simple, fast” to heart.


You can be assured that Microsoft was paying very close attention to OS X even before Apple became as big as they are. Important features like systemwide integrated search in Vista was present in OS X for years prior in Spotlight (which is STILL better than Windows Search, wtf), things like that. The focus on simplicity, misguided as it may be (I believe they are going way too far with Windows 8), is obviously present today.


RE: It's true
By DrChemist on 8/3/2012 1:41:39 PM , Rating: 2
I also recall a time when Sun was going to buy out an almost bankrupt Apple and MS paid to get them alive as competition. Plus they have a cross licensing agreement and I would bet that most of the innovation comes from the MS research labs which are 10-20 yrs ahead of what is bleeding edge tech now. Why pay for all that R&D when MS does most of it and you can cherry pick certain things and then design the phone. I totally agree that Apple is great at designing and incorporating newer technologies to push the market. It used to not work (ie. Firewire) but now that their popularity is so big it does.


RE: It's true
By raghwenda123 on 8/4/2012 8:52:37 AM , Rating: 2
I also recall Gates worked on Apple platform before 'copying' it(you may argue about apple copying from xerox,but they never released their own product anyway). And then they stole code from quicktime and Apple was forced to settle it out of court as Microsoft threatened to discontinue its office suite for mac. Apple was "forced" to sign cross licensing deal to stay "alive".
Heard of Next/Nextstep? You can credit Microsoft with certain things;innovating is not one of them. And for the record i don't own any Apple product.


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