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Windows 8 hits a milestone

Microsoft announced today that Windows 8 has been released to manufacturing (RTM). If you've been keeping up with the development of Windows 8, you already know that the official consumer release date for Microsoft's next generation operating system is October 26.
 
MSDN/TechNet members will get their first crack at Windows 8 on August 15. Members of Microsoft's Software Assurance program will have access one day later. Microsoft Action Pack Providers will be eligible on August 20 and Volume License customers can purchase the operating system on September 1.
 
As previously reported, customers can upgrade to Windows 8 via download for only $39.99 or $69.99 via a disc. For those that simply can't wait until October 26 to purchase a new computer, Microsoft is offering customers the chance to upgrade to Windows 8 for $14.99 via the Windows Upgrade Offer program.

 
Microsoft’s Steven Sinofsky had this to say about the development of Windows 8:
 
Back when we first demonstrated Windows 8 in May 2011, we described it as “reimagining Windows, from the chipset to the experience,” and that is what Windows 8 (and Windows RT) represents for both Microsoft and partners. The collective work: from the silicon, to the user experience, to new apps, has been an incredibly collaborative effort. Together we are bringing to customers a new PC experience that readies Windows PCs for a new world of scenarios and experiences, while also preserving an industry-wide 25-year investment in Windows software.
 
And for those wondering, the final build number for Windows 8 RTM is 9200.16384.win8_rtm.120725-1247

Sources: Microsoft [1], [2]



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-crickets-
By Argon18 on 8/1/2012 1:09:05 PM , Rating: 1
There is no compelling reason for anyone, whether private individual, or corporate business, to invest in Windows 8. Heck, most businesses have just barely moved to Windows 7, and many are still on XP.

Windows 8 is one of those versions that everone skips over.




RE: -crickets-
By Labotomizer on 8/1/2012 1:34:32 PM , Rating: 2
I suppose we have different definitions of "compelling reasons". Improved performance? Check. Improved resource management via improved Task Manager? Check. Enterprise grade hypervisor? Check. A better replacement for the start menu? Check.

You probably have a point on enterprise roll out as it's not unusual to skip a release. But that won't stop consumers from adopting Windows 8 in large numbers, although that will mostly be via new purchases. It also is the first OS that demonstrates what MS has been saying since they first released a Tablet PC, that tablets are computers. I can't wait to get my Surface RT on October 26th, which will be given to my daughter in January when the Surface Pro comes out.


RE: -crickets-
By JasonMick (blog) on 8/1/2012 1:46:06 PM , Rating: 5
This again?

"Chicago Sun-Times : Want Windows 95? Skip the 1st Version?"
Author: Don Crabb
Date: July 9, 1995

"Windows 98 was not Worth the Wait"
Aug. 1998: Chicago Tribune: Jimmy Gutterman

"Yawns greet Windows XP debut"
Cape Cod Online - Nov. 2001
http://www.capecodonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article...

"Windows XP: Readers: It's not worth the trouble"
CNET - 2001
http://news.cnet.com/2009-1001-274436.html

...nay sayers have been predicting Microsoft's demise for almost two decades now. And what has happened?

Windows 8 looks great. While it may not at first seem a natural fit for businesses, its brilliant in the mobile space, introducing an ultra-intuitive user interface for mobile devices.

The Surface has received rave reviews from almost everyone who has used it.

Of course for someone who spends most of his time brown-nosing for Apple, it does not surprise me that you would find Microsoft's innovation unappealing.


RE: -crickets-
By kleinma on 8/1/2012 2:05:44 PM , Rating: 2
The reason it doesn't make sense for business (yet) is because people have only seen it in a consumer facing product with consumer based live tiles.

I can imagine an enterprise deployment with a tighly controlled start screen making it super easy for users to access just the corporate programs they are supposed to.

It would be nice if MS mocked up what a potential start screen would look like for corp use.

One thing is for sure, MS employs a whole lot of people, and they are an enterprise company, and they will be using Windows 8 on everything, and a good chunk of the company has already been using it for some time.


RE: -crickets-
By melgross on 8/1/2012 2:22:29 PM , Rating: 2
Rave reviews? First of all, until this is released, it won't get a real review. Then you need some actual, useful, finished third party software to evaluate with it. Even Microsoft's own software isn't finished yet. At best, I would call what I've read, a hands on evaluation of a prototype.

I've had a chance to play with the Samsung 11.6" tablet for a short (about 20 minutes) while. I found Metro on the tablet far better than on my tower, where, so far, at least, it can be a horror. But, using the Desktop on the tablet was dreadful. I've seen just a few articles questioning this, where all the others seem to want to skip over this part. But, think about it for a moment. The convertable's that were being sold as tablets failed for at least two reasons. One was that they were much too big and heavy. I could never understand why someone would by one that weighed between 3.5 and 7 pounds, which is what they were weighing.

But the biggest problem was that even on the 15" screens the biggest had, the OS and it's apps we're very difficult to use. I remember hovering over a tiny menu item with the stylus before I tapped it so that it didn't hit the wrong thing. It still hit the wrong thing too often. Sweating while trying to save a document isn't pleasant.

These new tablets have screens between 10.6" for the Surface, to 11.6" for the Samsung. That's much smaller. I found tapping something on the Samsung screen to be frustrating. Touch is out of the question most of the time. Microsoft is trying to force this for Office. I can't even imagine using Excell on this as a Desktop app.


RE: -crickets-
By DiscoWade on 8/1/2012 3:09:57 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Windows 8 looks great.


I was agreeing with you until you said that.


RE: -crickets-
By Belard on 8/1/2012 9:08:42 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Windows 8 looks great. While it may not at first seem a natural fit for businesses, its brilliant in the mobile space, introducing an ultra-intuitive user interface for mobile devices.

Since when has my 26lb desktop and 10lb 24" LCD become a mobile device?

The interface is NOT intuitive, its frustrating to use and design by brain-dead monkeys.

And its butt-ugly too.


RE: -crickets-
By Ammohunt on 8/1/2012 9:12:37 PM , Rating: 2
Funny you didn't post the same about vista or ME....when the nay sayers were right.


RE: -crickets-
By Arsynic on 8/1/2012 2:04:59 PM , Rating: 2
Windows 8's consumer success will drive its enterprise success. When the people at the top want something, they get it!


RE: -crickets-
By melgross on 8/1/2012 3:05:44 PM , Rating: 2
That's true. IF it's a consumer success. It may be, and it may not be. This is a very big change. How many people here really believe that sales people at Best Buy and other retailers will understand this, even after some training? I don't have much hope of that. They are almost useless now.

And think of the confusion between RT and Pro x86 tablets. They will look the same on the screen, and the hardware will be pretty much the same except for a bit more thickness and weight. The difference will be in the price as far as most people will be able to see. What happens when they buy the cheaper RT model, and find it's not actually Windows (Desktop), and so their software won't work on it? The same thing that happened with the first Asus netbooks, when people bought them because they were cheaper, and found they weren't Windows, and so wouldn't run Windows apps. They brought them back.


RE: -crickets-
By augiem on 8/1/2012 6:05:16 PM , Rating: 2
Sadly, it WILL be a consumer success simply because of the fact that it will be bundled with nearly all new PCs sold. Regardless of whether the Surface or any other Win8 tablets are successful, the OS will sell like hotcakes, just like nearly every other Microsoft OS, because of desktop/notebook sales. Even if the likes of Dell, etc give you the option of 7/8, if you don't know any better, you're gonna think ... "8 is better than 7, right? I guess I'll take 8."


RE: -crickets-
By melgross on 8/2/2012 3:19:18 AM , Rating: 2
I judge success as to whether people are buying it because they want it, not because they feel they have no choice.


RE: -crickets-
By augiem on 8/2/2012 3:10:23 PM , Rating: 2
Unfortunately no industry measures success like that. Reality TV? People watch it because that's all that's on. The result? More reality TV is produced. At one point, it was probably successful because people wanted to watch it.

There's no way you can really judge any product like that. How do we know the majority of people bought 95/XP/Vista/7 because they wanted it and not because it was their only choice? With the OS, you have issues like needing to use the newest software and maintaining backward compatibility. In that sense, a long-time Windows user has little choice but to stay with MS and a Mac user to Apple.


RE: -crickets-
By WalksTheWalk on 8/2/2012 1:34:20 PM , Rating: 2
Given your hypothesis, who at the top is wanting Windows 8, and why?

Microsoft doesn't have the connotation of status, sexiness or being part of the "in" or "smart" crowd. Showing off your Windows Phone or Windows 8 machine isn't likely to impress anyone.

I don't see it being driven from the top C-level execs, unless it's a CIO that understands the built in integration with Microsoft infrastructure. But that's a practical argument not an emotional one and won't appeal to anyone at that "show off" level many execs like to operate at.


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