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Print 80 comment(s) - last by marianz.. on Aug 24 at 3:04 AM


  (Source: CH Design)
The latest iPhone may have a 4" screen, but it's basically the same old tried and true design

When it comes to next generation iPhone devices, it appears that Apple just can't plug the leaks of information to the public. In the case of the iPhone 4, a prototype was lost in a bar and subsequently wound up in the hands of Gizmodo. With the iPhone 4S -- and now with the "New iPhone" -- the leaks came from suppliers.
 
The latest leak on the "New iPhone" front comes from iLab Factory which has pictures of a fully assembled device (sans internal electronics). The repositioned speaker jack is clearly evident along with the smaller, 19-pin dock connector. The assembled device also confirms that Apple is going with a two-tone design theme for the "New iPhone", with the volume button, power button, and upper/lower halves of the back plate matching the color of the front plate of the device.
 
This latest leak also confirms that Apple must really love the overall design aesthetic that was initiated with the iPhone 4. We're guessing that Jony Ive must subscribe to the Porsche method of revamping products by making changes so subtle that you have to squint very hard to notice the new design details from generation to generation (a la Porsche 911).
 
But enough rambling, here are the shots of the assembled "New iPhone":
 
 


Apple's "New iPhone" [Image Source: iLab Factory]
 
To see more images including internal connectors, click here.

Sources: 9to5 Mac, iLab Factory



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What really needs to be changed?
By 91TTZ on 7/29/2012 1:40:04 PM , Rating: 2
I know that tech writers get bored when a design stays the same, but what really needs to be changed? Isn't is possible that as a design evolves, it gets closer and closer to being optimal and therefore doesn't need to change much? In fact, it seems like every manufacturer's smartphone is converging on the same basic design since it's so practical and effective.

It's like expecting a bicycle maker to radically change the design of the bike. What would really be the point of the change if there aren't any genuine improvements?




RE: What really needs to be changed?
By DiscoWade on 7/29/2012 2:28:08 PM , Rating: 1
If it ain't broke, don't fix it.


By karndog on 7/30/2012 11:48:48 AM , Rating: 5
And if it IS broke, then you're holding it wrong ;)


By Solandri on 7/29/2012 2:56:03 PM , Rating: 2
Phones have long since become fashion accessories. And consequently they need to change every year to create demand over and above the normal 2-3 year functional upgrade cycle. Most of Apple's lawsuits against Samsung stem from the fact that it looks like the competing Apple product.

Other things that should be functional but are becoming or have become fashion accessories are: Laptops (choice of colors, swappable lid covers, the minimalist design of the MBA which sacrifices functionality for clean lines), TVs (it's a black screen, but manufacturers insist on styling the bezel around the edges), and cars (do you really need to replace a car which runs perfectly well just because it's 5 years old?).


By pukemon on 7/30/2012 11:04:12 AM , Rating: 2
And that kind of got me thinking, if you're going to put the phone into a protective case anyway, is the design really that important?


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