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Researchers show off EV charging through the tires

Several notable issues are preventing electric vehicles from entering the mainstream consumer market today. Perhaps the biggest issue that is keeping the average consumer from buying an electric vehicle is range anxiety. Another major issue for many car shoppers that might otherwise consider an EV is a much higher cost of entry compared to a traditional automobile.

Another more pressing concern is one of recharging an EV and finding a power receptacle when away from home. A team of researchers from the Toyohashi University of Technology has unveiled a very novel and much more interesting way to recharge an electric vehicle wirelessly. The team from the University is led by Takashi Ohira and has recently been showing off a wireless electric field coupling system that can charge an EVs batteries through the tires. The big benefits of this system are four points of charging, rather than one point that we typically see in other wireless charging systems. That opens the door to the possibility of transferring more power to the vehicle at one time resulting in faster recharging.

The researchers have been showing a demo where a metal charge plate is placed under a four-inch layer of concrete to represent road surface. The team was able to transmit between 50 and 60 W of power through actual automobile tires and make a light bulb attached between the two tires turn on. The University researchers call the project EVER (Electric Vehicle on Electrified Roadway).

Another interesting possibility with wireless charging through the tires is that the team has been able to demonstrate the ability to transmit that power through a concrete block and into the tires of the vehicle to charge the batteries. That means with the right infrastructure an electric vehicle could be charged as it drives down the road.

There is no indication of when or if this project might be commercialized.

The U.S. Energy Department recognizes that charging is a challenge facing EVs and in April of 2012 offered up to $4 million to companies willing to develop wireless chargers for EVs. So far, most of the wireless chargers we've seen consist of some sort of charger on the surface of the driveway or road and a receiver mounted to the underside of the vehicle.

Source: Phys.org



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RE: Don't really get it.
By kingmotley on 7/11/2012 12:27:10 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Because people are both stupid and lazy.

Well you've proven half of that. Good job. Wireless charging is an excellent idea, and one that would definitely help to propel EVs into the general population. Charging stations would become vandal proof (or at least more vandal proof). I currently fill my tank about once every two weeks, and having to remember to drag a cord to fill my car up every night doesn't sound like a good selling point to me. Laying down 4 mats in my garage and never having to fill my tank up with gas in the middle of winter on the other hand, does.

And small percentages of loss even at the social aggregate standpoint is small. It's small in respect to total aggregate wasted electicity, adn it is small in respect of the potential gains to society if it brings about change from using gas to EVs in the general populace. If your electric system is near the breaking point now, perhaps that needs be fixed, but complaining minor waste isn't the solution.

You want to fix waste, make sure you unplug all your electronics when you aren't using them. Like your TV that saps electricity when "off" so you can turn it on with the remote. Your coffee pot. Your microwave that probably still has the time set to 12:00. Stereos, electric razors, your DVR when it isn't recording or playing, your game consoles, etc I bet all of these waste more power than think.


RE: Don't really get it.
By Motoman on 7/11/2012 12:29:25 PM , Rating: 2
You're wrong in every way. See post I just made showing what the actual cost is. Only stupid, lazy people are proponents of field induction charging.


RE: Don't really get it.
By kingmotley on 7/11/2012 12:38:08 PM , Rating: 1
You're wrong in every way. See post I just made showing what the actual cost is. Only stupid, lazy people are proponents of sending all our money to the middle east.


RE: Don't really get it.
By Motoman on 7/11/2012 12:52:22 PM , Rating: 3
Your failure is complete.

As I've pointed out, saying that "we already waste $X so we may as well waste an additiona $Y" is a statement that only an abject moron would make. So, if NYC residents are already wasting $100 million a year, may as well waste another $30 million a year too? One can only hope that's the stupidest thing you've ever said - but I fear it probably isn't.

Also, since oil is a fungible commodity, we're not "sending all our money to the middle east." Just to point that out too.


RE: Don't really get it.
By kingmotley on 7/11/2012 1:26:32 PM , Rating: 2
Your failure is only bound by your own inability to think in bigger terms.


RE: Don't really get it.
By Motoman on 7/11/2012 1:33:19 PM , Rating: 2
Of the two of us, it's eminently clear that I'm the only one who is seeing the whole picture.

You are wrong, I have demonstrated that you're wrong, and you need to admit that you're wrong.


RE: Don't really get it.
By Schrag4 on 7/11/2012 1:27:42 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You're wrong in every way. See post I just made showing what the actual cost is. Only stupid, lazy people are proponents of sending all our money to the middle east.


Not to take sides, but if you want people to listen to you, you should be intellectually honest and not imply that "sending all our money to the middle east" is the only alternative to wireless recharging. Plugging your car in, while a bit of a hassle (not that bad, come on) is practically lossless from a transfer perspective. Not only that, but "sending all our money to the middle east?" You're kidding, right? Do you really not have any clue where we get our oil from? I'll grant you that a minority of it comes from the middle east, but definitly not "all of our money" is spent on fuel to begin with. Terms like "all/always" and "never" are often wrong - definitely wrong in this case.


RE: Don't really get it.
By kingmotley on 7/11/2012 1:35:46 PM , Rating: 2
Actually, I have a pretty good handle on where our oil actually comes from. 42% is produced domestically, with 58% coming from international trades, of which the majority comes from Canada, Mexico, Saudia Arabia, Venezuela, and Nigeria.

Alas, the exact numbers weren't really the point. Drilling down into specifics really does not help clarify the issue. So let's just leave it at the majority of the money spent (58%, not including expenses like international diplomacy, wars, etc -- just straight up per barrel cost on the market) is sent outside of the US.


RE: Don't really get it.
By Schrag4 on 7/11/2012 4:41:04 PM , Rating: 2
Right, right, I wasn't saying you didn't understand. I'm just saying you might want to be honest. Implying we have 2 options (1. Adopt wireless EV charging tech or 2. Give all of our money to the middle east) isn't honest.

At this point I'm willing to accept that you were just a little excited when you made that suggestion earlier.


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