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Researchers show off EV charging through the tires

Several notable issues are preventing electric vehicles from entering the mainstream consumer market today. Perhaps the biggest issue that is keeping the average consumer from buying an electric vehicle is range anxiety. Another major issue for many car shoppers that might otherwise consider an EV is a much higher cost of entry compared to a traditional automobile.

Another more pressing concern is one of recharging an EV and finding a power receptacle when away from home. A team of researchers from the Toyohashi University of Technology has unveiled a very novel and much more interesting way to recharge an electric vehicle wirelessly. The team from the University is led by Takashi Ohira and has recently been showing off a wireless electric field coupling system that can charge an EVs batteries through the tires. The big benefits of this system are four points of charging, rather than one point that we typically see in other wireless charging systems. That opens the door to the possibility of transferring more power to the vehicle at one time resulting in faster recharging.

The researchers have been showing a demo where a metal charge plate is placed under a four-inch layer of concrete to represent road surface. The team was able to transmit between 50 and 60 W of power through actual automobile tires and make a light bulb attached between the two tires turn on. The University researchers call the project EVER (Electric Vehicle on Electrified Roadway).

Another interesting possibility with wireless charging through the tires is that the team has been able to demonstrate the ability to transmit that power through a concrete block and into the tires of the vehicle to charge the batteries. That means with the right infrastructure an electric vehicle could be charged as it drives down the road.

There is no indication of when or if this project might be commercialized.

The U.S. Energy Department recognizes that charging is a challenge facing EVs and in April of 2012 offered up to $4 million to companies willing to develop wireless chargers for EVs. So far, most of the wireless chargers we've seen consist of some sort of charger on the surface of the driveway or road and a receiver mounted to the underside of the vehicle.

Source: Phys.org



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Meh
By Florinator on 7/11/2012 12:10:13 PM , Rating: 2
I think these are all relatively silly ideas, nice to talk about in an academic environment. Just imagine the costs of rebuilding the road infrastructure to support ANY KIND of charging while driving...

IMHO, what we need to solve is the problem of energy storage. Gasoline is so awesome because it stores a huge amount of energy in a relatively low volume. Batteries are awful in this respect.

I can't wait for someone to come up with a commercially viable super-capacitor technology (hello EEStor, are you guys for real???), which could revolutionize the world of automobiles. Quick recharge (probably faster than filling up a 20 gal tank of gasoline), no restrictions on how much current can be pulled out of it, much longer lifespan (recharge cycles) and probably not as heavy as conventional batteries either.

About 2 months ago I bought a set of 10 solar lights for my backyard. The small solar panel recharges a NiCd battery during the day, which powers a small LED at night. 4 of them stopped working already! Great technology, thank you China! F...udge!!!




RE: Meh
By WayneCoffee on 7/11/2012 12:51:01 PM , Rating: 2
why don't you thank the capitalism too? lol


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