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Ford C-Max has 2-year payback period

Ford is bragging about its new C-Max Hybrid utility vehicle and its 47 mpg (city) fuel economy rating. Ford says that its vehicle is at least three mpg better than the Toyota Prius v and has more performance and technology. Ford is also proud that the C-Max is more efficient and powerful all starting at $1,300 less than the Prius v.
 
Ford is projecting fuel efficiency ratings for the C-Max of 47 mpg in the city and 44 mpg on the highway compared to the Toyota Prius v ratings of 44 mpg city and 40 mpg on the highway. Ford says that the C-Max can travel over 500 miles per tank of fuel and has a total system horsepower rating of 188 HP compared to 134 HP for the Prius.
 
The C-Max Hybrid will start at $25,995.

 
“The C-MAX Hybrid builds on Ford’s 20 years of hybrid innovation and fuel-efficient offerings to take on Prius v with better city fuel economy at 47 mpg and at better value – a great chance for us to shake up the hybrid market,” said Raj Nair, group vice president, Global Product Development.
 
Ford expects that this car will lure in a large percentage of mainstream buyers because the vehicle offers the segments lowest hybrid payback period of two years compared to typical small crossovers. Typically, it takes many years for buyers of a hybrid vehicle to break even compared to purchasing a standard vehicle due to the much higher cost of the a hybrid vehicle. Ford research shows that the typical payback period for a hybrid vehicle in the C-Max's category is four years.

Source: Ford



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RE: No thanks
By Philippine Mango on 7/11/2012 3:41:33 PM , Rating: 2
The CAFE numbers USED to be the official fuel economy numbers you would see on the Monroney sticker (sticker that is affixed to all new cars that shows the vehicle's fuel economy) but then drivers complained about the numbers being unrealistic. To appease drivers, in 1985, they increased the strictness of the fuel economy standard that is displayed on the Monroney sticker but not the CAFE standard itself. People weren't happy with those numbers either so in 2007, they increased that standard again. Now, one way to surreptitiously increase the fuel economy standard without giving the news media an easily articulated sound bite would be if the government changed the CAFE testing procedures to match those used already for the Monroney sticker... So 54mpg CAFE fleet wide fuel economy would in actuality be 54mpg fleet wide fuel economy.


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