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Ford C-Max has 2-year payback period

Ford is bragging about its new C-Max Hybrid utility vehicle and its 47 mpg (city) fuel economy rating. Ford says that its vehicle is at least three mpg better than the Toyota Prius v and has more performance and technology. Ford is also proud that the C-Max is more efficient and powerful all starting at $1,300 less than the Prius v.
 
Ford is projecting fuel efficiency ratings for the C-Max of 47 mpg in the city and 44 mpg on the highway compared to the Toyota Prius v ratings of 44 mpg city and 40 mpg on the highway. Ford says that the C-Max can travel over 500 miles per tank of fuel and has a total system horsepower rating of 188 HP compared to 134 HP for the Prius.
 
The C-Max Hybrid will start at $25,995.

 
“The C-MAX Hybrid builds on Ford’s 20 years of hybrid innovation and fuel-efficient offerings to take on Prius v with better city fuel economy at 47 mpg and at better value – a great chance for us to shake up the hybrid market,” said Raj Nair, group vice president, Global Product Development.
 
Ford expects that this car will lure in a large percentage of mainstream buyers because the vehicle offers the segments lowest hybrid payback period of two years compared to typical small crossovers. Typically, it takes many years for buyers of a hybrid vehicle to break even compared to purchasing a standard vehicle due to the much higher cost of the a hybrid vehicle. Ford research shows that the typical payback period for a hybrid vehicle in the C-Max's category is four years.

Source: Ford



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RE: Competition win
By quiksilvr on 7/9/2012 11:19:22 AM , Rating: 1
Damn. You intrigued me to do some more research, and I discovered that it's STILL using Nickel Metal Hydride battery, which is cheaper, but is twice the weight, performs poorly in colder temperatures, has a lot fewer recharge cycles, and charges slower.


RE: Competition win
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 7/9/2012 11:27:35 AM , Rating: 3
Well, Toyota claims that NiMH is more proven and reliable tech so that's why it's sticking with it. However, I think it all comes down to meeting a certain price point.

In Japan, the Prius v has lithium-ion batteries (which are smaller and lighter as you point out). There's even enough room for a folding third-row seat in the Japanese market vehicle (something that couldn't be done with the bulkier NiMH batteries in the U.S. market vehicle).


RE: Competition win
By rudy on 7/9/2012 12:06:39 PM , Rating: 4
I think you mean something that could not be done with the bulkier humans in the U.S. market.


RE: Competition win
By kmmatney on 7/9/2012 12:41:05 PM , Rating: 2
Toyota is able to keep the number of charge cycles pretty high with the NiMH betteries by never allowing it to drain below 155 capacity, and by never charging it more than 85% capacity. This wastes a lot of capacity, but keeps the number of charge cycles high. My in-laws have 2 Prius cars, and on one the battery pack dies just before the 7 year warranty ended (so it was replaced free), and on the other the battery is still fine after 8 years. Compare this is my 3 Roombas using NiMH batteries - those batteries die in about 18 monthes.


RE: Competition win
By kmmatney on 7/9/2012 12:44:19 PM , Rating: 3
should be: "never allowing it to drain below 15% capacity"

BTW - I don't have a link for this, but this is what he was told when he bought his 2002 Prius. He pre-ordered the first U.S. model, which had a few teething issues, so he was at the dealer quite a bit in the begining.


RE: Competition win
By alpha754293 on 7/9/2012 3:34:51 PM , Rating: 2
2nd gen NA Prius keeps the battery SOC between 40-60%.

3rd gen NA Prius keeps the battery SOC between 40-80%.

They bumped the upper limit up.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation

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