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Volt sales continue to grow

General Motors has been pushing the Volt for well over a year as sales continue to rise and fall depending on the month. In March of 2012, GM suspended production of the Volt due to weak demand. Production of the Volt was started back up in April of 2012, earlier than expected, thanks to an uptick in demand for the extended range electric vehicle.
 
General Motors has now announced that in June 2012 it sold 1,760 Volts, which is double what it sold in June 2011. So far in 2012 General Motors the sold 8,817 Volts, which adds up to more than three times the 2,745 Volts that it sold in the same period of 2011. In fact, so far in 2012 GM has sold more Volts than in all of 2011. Total Volts sales in 2011 were roughly 7,600 units.
 
General Motors continues to outsell its closest Japanese rival, the Nissan Leaf by more than 3 to 1. That is no surprise considering the Leaf is a pure electric vehicle whereas the Volt has an onboard generator that allows for a much longer driving distance than the Leaf.
 
Compared to the Volt, sales of the Nissan Leaf plummeted 69% for June to 535 units. Nissan has only been able to sell 3,418 Leaf EV's so far in 2012, a decline of 19% over the same period 2011.

Nissan maintains that will sell 20,000 Leaf EVs in the US this year, but that seems far-fetched. Nissan would need to sell 2763 Leafs each month for the remainder of the year, which is more of the vehicles than Nissan has sold all year.

Source: Detroit News



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RE: Ford Fusion FTW!
By Solandri on 7/5/2012 3:47:33 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
it needs to provide proper torque and be hooked to the transmission, rather than just wired to the batteries.

At that point, you're just using the batteries as a transmission. That's only superior if the energy losses and weight of the engine -> battery -> electric motor -> wheels are less than the energy losses and weight of the engine -> transmission -> wheels.

In particular, batteries tend to drop in efficiency (both charging and drawing) at higher current. That is, the more quickly you charge or draw power from the battery, the greater then percentage of energy which gets converted into waste heat. So aside from the low-torque regime of mechanical motors, batteries will tend to be an inferior solution any time you're demanding high power output.


RE: Ford Fusion FTW!
By twhittet on 7/5/2012 4:20:03 PM , Rating: 2
Once again, everything you wrote is pointless, and partially wrong (when talking about the Volt specifically). See Dr. K's explanation for further details.


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