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  (Source: Microsoft)
Any version of Windows XP, Vista, or 7 will be eligible for inexpensive upgrade

Say what you will about its touch reforms, and extreme user interface makeover, but Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) is at least moving aggressively to give its customers a favorable price point.

To counter Apple, Inc.'s (AAPL) $19.99 USD Mountain Lion licensing, Microsoft is offering Windows 8 "Pro" for only $39.99 USD via download.  A DVD version will be available for $69.99 USD (that's one expensive disc).  Clearly Microsoft is trying to funnel customers to its online process, which it hopes will lead to a more pain-free and automated installation.

Comments Microsoft:

We believe that your upgrade experience in Windows 8 will be a breeze by offering a faster experience, a single upgrade path, and compatibility from prior versions of Windows. We’ve continued to listen to our customers and have expanded the ability to download to over 100 countries and 37 languages. We have simplified the Windows upgrade experience with the Windows 8 Upgrade Assistant which supports you during your upgrade with everything from selecting your language to pausing your download to built-in compatibility checks - it’s seamless. And if you’re an enthusiast you will have the flexibility to download and control how you upgrade.

Somewhat strangely Microsoft is offering customers who purchase the download the option to purchase a backup DVD for $15.  In other words you can order the download and get a DVD via the backup option for $54.99 USD, or pay $15 USD extra to buy it in store.

It seems a bit counterintuitive, to say the least.

Of course if you want to snag a download or disc install be sure to first check that your hardware is capable of running Windows 8.  To test that you can grab Microsoft's Release Preview of Windows 8 from here, which comes with a test-phase build of the upgrade assitant.

Windows Team engineer Brandon LeBlanc writes Microsoft is continuing to "drive toward the RTM milestone."

Source: Windows Team Blog



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RE: 39$ to get of my start button?
By Motoman on 7/2/2012 5:22:30 PM , Rating: 1
MS is full of BS.

This is like Chrome and Opera removing the URL history arrow from their address bars, claiming "no one ever uses them." This is some of the stupidest stuff any IT company has ever done.


RE: 39$ to get of my start button?
By Florinator on 7/2/2012 5:32:08 PM , Rating: 3
Yeah, I guess that's why they have been so successful for 37 years, because they are stupid and made a lot of mistakes...


By Trisped on 7/2/2012 5:41:27 PM , Rating: 3
Companies can change. They often do as leadership and market pressures change.


By Motoman on 7/3/2012 11:41:42 AM , Rating: 2
Success is not an indicator of virtue.

When people say something like "hey, we hit our sales target, so we must be doing something right!" you should punch them in the face. It means no such thing...all it may mean is that you appear to suck less than your competitors...and if you shaped up, maybe you'd double your sales figures.


RE: 39$ to get of my start button?
By Trisped on 7/2/2012 5:46:01 PM , Rating: 1
I agree that MS is BSing.

Your analogy doesn't work for me though. I rarely ever used the URL history arrow. With integrated search I usually just type what I am looking for and either select a Google search or click on the history item I am looking for. Even if I did use a site enough that it would be in the URL history and I did not want to type the first 2-3 letters of the URL into the bar, a link to the site would be on my start page as either the 8 most visited pages or as a bookmark.


RE: 39$ to get of my start button?
By bah12 on 7/3/2012 10:07:27 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
With integrated search I usually just type what I am looking for and either select a Google search or click on the history item I am looking for. Even if I did use a site enough that it would be in the URL history and I did not want to type the first 2-3 letters of the URL into the bar, a link to the site would be on my start page as either the 8 most visited pages or as a bookmark.

So why are you so opposed to this OBVIOUSLY more efficient way of doing things at the OS level? By your own admission searching is FAR superior than drudging through history (aka short cuts, aka the start menu). Honestly since Win7 I rarely open control panel. The clicks involved to do so are not nearly as quick as typing the first 3 letter of what I want to do. Tell me that changing the power profile is easier by using the lame start menu vs typing... pow, down arrow, enter.

If the search is smart enough (and since Win7 it now is), you don't need to stroll around looking for crap. Web users have known this for years now, why all the resistance on the OS side?


RE: 39$ to get of my start button?
By AmbroseAthan on 7/2/2012 5:48:34 PM , Rating: 2
You can add the history button back in Opera (dragging it out of the Buttons in the Appearance area). But like you said, no idea why it was removed as a default.


RE: 39$ to get of my start button?
By Motoman on 7/2/2012 7:45:19 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah I know. The worst part is that Opera won't admit it's wrong, and put it back in by default, despite *overwhelming* pressure from the user community to do so.

It's one thing to do something stupid, then admit it was stupid and fix it. To pretend that what you did wasn't stupid, when it clearly was, and not do anything about it is rather spectacular.


RE: 39$ to get of my start button?
By Belard on 7/2/2012 10:44:45 PM , Rating: 2
Opera's trashcan is more usable... but click on history from the menu isn't difficult. and of course the UI is super customizable.


"I want people to see my movies in the best formats possible. For [Paramount] to deny people who have Blu-ray sucks!" -- Movie Director Michael Bay














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