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  (Source: amazonaws.com)
Some of the factories included in the report are Foxconn Technology Group, Toyo Precision Appliance, and BYD Electronic Co.

China Labor Watch has released a new report showing that employees at Apple's suppliers in China are overworked and were not provided proper health insurance.

China Labor Watch, which is a New York-based labor rights group, created a 133-page report on the conditions of Apple's suppliers' factories in China. The group interviewed 620 workers in 10 factories located throughout China over a four-month period ending in April.

Some of the factories included in the report are Foxconn Technology Group, Toyo Precision Appliance, and BYD Electronic Co.

According to the report, employees worked up to 180 hours of overtime per month when they are only supposed to work a maximum of 36. In addition, some of the factories failed to provide medical insurance to their employees, which is problematic because the factories are hazardous environments.

China Labor Watch also found that a Riteng factory in particular had terrible working conditions where employees were working 12-hour days. Most Foxconn employees work 10-hour days. Also, the rate at Riteng is 8.2 yuan per hour while the average rate is 10.2 yuan per hour at Foxconn.

"From our investigations we found that the labor rights violations at Foxconn also exist in virtually all other Apple supplier factories, and in many cases, are actually significantly more dire than at Foxconn," said China Labor Watch.

Back in January of this year, The New York Times published a report showing that Apple's Asian suppliers were violating the code of conduct repeatedly while Apple did nothing about it. The report described the daily lives of Apple's suppliers' employees, such as those at Apple's top electronics supplier Foxconn. Employees here complained of long working hours and overtime, where many worked 12-hour days at six or more days per week. Some employees’ legs would swell from standing so long as shifts ran 24 hours per day. According to Apple's code of conduct, employees are not to work over 60 hours per week. After the shift ended, 70,000 of Foxconn's employees are crammed into tiny dorms. As many as 20 employees are stuffed into a three-bedroom apartment.

Factory conditions were also a noted issue. For instance, the collection of aluminum dust inside Foxconn's factories in Chengdu and Shanghai resulted in two separate explosions. The first occurred in May 2011 in Foxconn's Chengdu factory, and the second occurred in the Shanghai factory in December 2011.

Apple responded to China Labor Watch's recent report saying that it has been making checks at its supply chain partners regularly.

"As part of our ongoing supplier responsibility program, our team has conducted thorough audits at every facility in China Labor Watch's report," said Kristin Huguet, Apple spokeswoman. "In some places, our auditors found issues similar to those described by China Labor Watch, including overtime violations."

Source: Reuters



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RE: WTF???????
By superstition on 7/4/2012 12:09:05 AM , Rating: 2
People have a hard-on for Apple bashing. It's like a vestige of the often cult-like partisan divide between "Macs and PCs" that has been so important to so many for so many years—particularly PC users frequenting this site who equate Apple with "San Francisco liberal limp-wristed latte-drinking elitists".

Back when the IBM PC was DOS-based, Macs were derided as toy-like things for elitists who are too stupid to use computers. Then, once Windows copied most of the Mac GUI, the complaints changed (such as "Macs are overpriced"—even when comparable PCs weren't necessarily less expensive, particularly in terms of TCO).

Perhaps there will be a silver lining and people will actually start to care enough to do something, instead of just feigning worker support. But, from what I've seen, most people do things like bash Julian Assange/Bradley Manning/Wikileaks for bringing to our attention stories about how the US pressured Haiti into not raising its minimum wage at the behest of US corporations like Hanes and Levi Strauss. There's always lots of outrage to go around, but it's usually misdirected.

I like the idea of funneling some of this outrage, if it is indeed genuine in terms of originating from a desire to see improved worker conditions, into pressuring the government to craft legislation that will affect all workers used by businesses doing business in the USA. Improved universal workers' rights standards for anyone doing business in our country should be a priority. But, that's not going to happen. We'll just allow companies to continue to exploit the poor like we always have while pointing inane fingers with hollow outrage.


"I modded down, down, down, and the flames went higher." -- Sven Olsen














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