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  (Source: TechReport)
Decreasing SSD prices and increasing HDD prices bring to formats closer and cost

One of the things that has long kept many people from adopting an SSD to replace the hard drive inside their computer or notebook has been cost. Traditionally, a SSD is much more expensive than a normal hard drive and SSDs always have considerably less storage than a comparably priced hard drive.

However, the adoption of SSDs is growing significantly in the computer industry with more and more people willing to pay the price for better performance.
 
The good news for those who are currently in the market to purchase a new SSD is that prices are in a steady and substantial decline according to TechReport. The steady decline in price of SSD storage combined with the increase in price for hard drive storage resulting from a massive flooding in Thailand means the difference in price between the two storage formats is getting closer and closer.
 
The data comes by way of a company called Camelegg, which tracks prices at Newegg. According to the data, which looks at some specific popular SSD models, prices are coming down significantly. One example is the Intel 510 series SSD's that started out over $600 in March of 2011 and in June of 2012 are now below $500. Most enthusiasts shy away from the Intel SSD's because they tend to be some the more expensive devices out there.
 
A more commonly purchased SSD on the enthusiast end of the spectrum would be something along the lines of the Corsair Force Series GT. The data shows that the 240 GB version of that SSD started at slightly less than $500 in July of last year and in June of this year the price dropped to roughly $350. That's a $150 price reduction in a bit less than a year.
 
OCZ and its popular line of Vertex 3 SSDs have seen similar price reductions starting at a bit more than $500 in April 2011 and dropping to just over $200 as of June of this year for 240 GB model.

Other popular SSDs have seen similar price declines over the last six months to one year making this a prime time to purchase SSD storage.

Source: TechReport



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RE: Whoa!
By Lord 666 on 6/24/2012 9:48:10 AM , Rating: 2
Was being lazy from my mobile device. Those benchmarks don't compare Sandforce drives where density hit have been more noticeable.

In response to reclaimer, I never stated desktop raid. My focus has been on enterprise...think 16 bay chassis dl380 g8. The debate still revolves around "spindles" too. Not only are the 240s faster than 480s in absolute speed, in a raid10 array qty 4 240gb will smoke qty 2 480 at less cost but same storage.

The problem about anandtech is it needs to focus a bit more on the enterprise vertical. There were a spurt of enterprise articles, but since has faded.


RE: Whoa!
By Reclaimer77 on 6/24/2012 11:33:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The problem about anandtech is it needs to focus a bit more on the enterprise vertical. There were a spurt of enterprise articles, but since has faded.


I would prefer they spin off an entirely new site for that. Anandtech is perfect just the way it is, with an amazingly informative wealth of knowledge there for the desktop user/enthusiast.


RE: Whoa!
By Lord 666 on 6/24/2012 12:27:54 PM , Rating: 2
Spinning something off of Anandtech or combining the best of both worlds would be a great addition. Sort of like how to bastardize consumer gear to make it work for enterprise, but on a budget.

Typically business spend, not prosumer/enthusiast purchases, drives adoption and lower costs. SSDs seem to be where lessons learned from consumers is trickling up to business.


"I modded down, down, down, and the flames went higher." -- Sven Olsen

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