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Original M5 and current M5  (Source: Insideline)
M5 loses US only six-speed manual option

Many auto enthusiasts have had high hopes for BMW and manual transmissions after a patent application for the carmaker surfaced showing a seven-speed manual transmission was in the works. That transmission may still make it to the streets in some BMWs, but it won't be in the future BMW M5.
 
BMW has gone "official", saying that the next generation M5 will not be engineered with a manual transmission. BMW goes a little further with M division head, Albert Biermann, saying it's not cost-effective given the manual's low take rate. The upside is the more enthusiast focused M3 will continue to offer a manual transmission.
 
"Last year, maybe 15-20 percent of our M5s in the U.S. were manuals and maybe this year it will be 15 percent. It's declining," Biermann warned. "The trouble is that nobody wants it in Europe or anywhere else, so this will be the last time we do it, even for the hard-core U.S. buyers."
 
The current M5 offers a six-speed manual transmission alongside a no-cost option for a seven-speed double-clutch unit that shifts with paddles. BMW says offering the six-speed manual was very expensive.
 
"We just can't justify it anymore. It's a no-cost option, but it's been very difficult to do."
 
"Theoretically the stick is cheaper, but it's very low volumes and we have to strengthen everything in the gearbox and find space for the shifter and another pedal, so it doesn't work out cheaper."
 
The six-speed manual in the M5 has only been available in the U.S.

Source: Insideline



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I doubt Euro customers are all opting for the DCT
By Beenthere on 6/21/2012 1:57:41 PM , Rating: 2
I'd understand the cost issue if the manual trans was only for the U.S. but it is not and the car is built for a manual trans. so this is just marketing rationalization, not reality. I'd love to see the take rates in Europe for the M5. I'll bet it's more like 50/50.

FWIW, the DCT trans is still the smart way to go but I am well aware that many people don't think they are driving sportily if they aren't grinding gears in a manual trans.

At the statospheric prices BMW charges for the M5, you should be able to get whatever trans makes you happy and they should bow down to you and thank you for buying such a profitable car for BMW.

As far as arrogant/incompetent drivers -- that is primarily a U.S. issue IME, more than anywhere else that I have traveled. 95.92684% of U.S. drivers can't back out of a driveway without having an accident.




RE: I doubt Euro customers are all opting for the DCT
By Spuke on 6/21/2012 3:33:53 PM , Rating: 2
I guess you missed the part where he said,
quote:
"The trouble is that nobody wants it in Europe or anywhere else


By Beenthere on 6/21/2012 6:04:25 PM , Rating: 2
I guess you've never been to Germany/Europe... Probably 90% of all vehicles sold are manual trans or DCT. Full automatics only sell to people who have no driving skills. Most Europeans would not be caught dead in an automatic trans car because of the stigma and lower mpg. Gas across the pond cost ~$7.50/gal. so they don't want no stinkin automatic trans - despite the dribble from BMW's talking head.

FYI - The talking head was trying to justify an internal decision by BMW. German engineers are known for TELLING customers what they should desire, not GIVING them what they desire . This cultural faux paux has cost them dearly over the years in spite of their sales success.


By Skywalker123 on 6/22/2012 3:49:51 AM , Rating: 2
You've never been farther than 100 miles from your double wide in Mississippi


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