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The Model S also received a 265-mile range on the EPA's new five-cycle testing procedure

Tesla's top-of-the-line Model S has finally received its EPA ratings, and as previously predicted, the vehicle landed a 265-mile range.

Tesla's Model S is an electric sedan that comes in three different versions, with 40 kWh, 60 kWh or 85 kWh battery packs. The lower-end 40 kWh base model will sell for $57,400 while the higher-end model will sell for $105,400. The Model S is eligible for the $7,500 federal electric tax credit as well.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its ratings for the high-end 85 kWh Model S, giving the electric sedan a mile per gallon equivalent (MPGe) rating of 89 combined, or 88 city and 90 highway.

Also, the Model S underwent the EPA's new five-cycle testing procedure scoring a 265-mile range. The vehicle also landed a 300-mile range using the EPA's traditional two-cycle testing. This puts the Model S far ahead of the electric competition.

With
these kinds of EPA ratings, the Model S is sure to gain some attention. In fact, the EV has already proved to be a popular addition to Tesla's electric family with 10,000 reservations so far, where each customer had to pay $5,000 to reserve the vehicle.


Also, the automaker expects the Model S to help bump its annual revenue estimate to $560 million to $600 million USD, which is about $175 million per quarter. This is about six times its current revenue.

Last month, Tesla also announced that the Model S would arrive ahead of schedule, causing the automaker's stock to surge.

Clearly, the Model S has been helpful for Tesla's pocket, which took a big hit earlier this year. In Q1 2012, the automaker poured out $89.9 million USD in losses. Since 2009, Tesla has reported losses of over $500 million USD.

Tesla Motors received $465 million in federal loans from the U.S. Department of Energy in order to retrofit a former General Motors and Toyota factory as well as develop the Model S. So far, Tesla has used about $360 million of that loan.

Tesla will begin shipping the Model S tomorrow.

Source: Auto Blog



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RE: where's the * ?
By protomech on 6/21/2012 2:10:09 PM , Rating: 2
Strong headwinds or crosswinds and steep grades will detrimentally affect any car. I still haven't seen a weight for the S, but it's surely high; this will hurt city range, but very sleek aerodynamics will help highway range. So perhaps the differential is smaller.


RE: where's the * ?
By Shig on 6/21/2012 2:31:08 PM , Rating: 3
Here's more info on the EPA tests.

"When the Tesla Roadster was certified, the EPA only used a 2-cycle test that was carried out under conditions of 75 degrees Fahrenheit ambient temperature and with varying acceleration rates and driving speeds for both city and highway tests topping out at 60 mph. Recently, the EPA incorporated three additional cycles into their tests that push vehicles to greater limits. The additional cycles added as part of the new “5-cycle test” include a cold driving cycle that requires heater use, a hot weather cycle with air conditioning operation, and a high-speed cycle (reaching 80mph) with rapid accelerations.

We are very pleased to report that Model S has exceeded our initial range expectations by about 20 miles and has achieved a Roadster equivalent 2-cycle range of 320 miles and a 5-cycle range of 265 miles."

http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/model-s-efficiency...

The 5 cycle test seems pretty new. I wonder how many cars are out there now that have overly inflated MPG based on unrealistic tests. The 2 cycle test is kind of worthless.


RE: where's the * ?
By AssBall on 6/21/2012 2:44:22 PM , Rating: 3
In this case, there's nothing not to like about this motor except the price and the subsidies.

Oh, and that you have to plug it in to charge. I'm sure that kind of thing will be coming to Wamsutter or Sinclair real soon. And then you can read comics for 8 hours.

Otherwise, if you plan ahead, 265 miles sounds great.


RE: where's the * ?
By SlyNine on 6/21/2012 3:15:10 PM , Rating: 2
If you're driving around in W.y. I wouldn't recommend an electric just yet LOL. To many miles of nothing.

Plus, I'm sure almost everyone that visits this site has no idea where, or what Wamsutter is. I work at Loves in W.y. and had no idea where it was.


RE: where's the * ?
By Focher on 6/22/2012 8:10:36 PM , Rating: 2
That's not a realistic analysis of electric vehicle range, because it assumes you only make 265 mile trips. For the vast majority of people, you are not going to drive 265 miles in a day which then allows you to leave the car for charging.


RE: where's the * ?
By alpha754293 on 6/22/2012 9:14:00 AM , Rating: 2
EPA UDDS and HWFET have both been the "staple" for emissions testing (which is actually how they back-calculate the fuel economy from that -- so for those that thing they actually measure the fuel consumption during the test - that is DEFINITELY not true).

SC03, US06, and LA92 were added in 1996 as supplementary test procedures.

As far as I know, I think they revised the UDDS/FTP and HWFET I THINK in 2003 (but don't quote me on that) which gave way to the new fuel economy ratings (in order for it to be more "representative" of "real world" conditions). The reality is that fuel economy is ALWAYS going to vary because how you drive is different from how others drive and that has a HUGEEEE impact on the results.

For more information about the EPA test cycles, see:
http://www.epa.gov/oms/standards/light-duty/index....

http://www.epa.gov/nvfel/testing/dynamometer.htm

Note though that of course, for HEVs, PHEVs, and EVs, the testing procedure has been changed again (since EVs and PHEVs either don't have or have very little tailpipe emissions so the method of collecting air (emissions) samples doesn't work any more (of course, naturally).

I haven't read/seen what their new testing procedures are for HEVs, PHEVs, or EVs are.


RE: where's the * ?
By Keeir on 6/22/2012 11:15:40 AM , Rating: 2
They use a 24 hour soak charge.

Run the Test.

Measure electric current used to recharge the battery over another 24 hour soak charge...


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