backtop


Print 30 comment(s) - last by nanlee.. on Jul 13 at 1:59 PM


Shenzhou 9's three-person crew, including China's first female astronaut  (Source: planetary.org)
The Shenzhou 9 made its way into space on a Chinese Long March 2F rocket on Saturday, June 16

China successfully completed its first manned docking in space today using the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft and the Tiangong 1 space module.

"We are one step closer to our destination of constructing a future space station," said an official with China's space program. "This is the first successful crew transportation mission for China."

The Shenzhou 9 made its way into space on a Chinese Long March 2F rocket on Saturday, June 16. It launched from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in the Gansu province in northern China.

The Shenzhou 9 successfully docked at the Tiangong 1 space module in automatic mode today, marking the first manned docking for China. China is the third country (after the United States and Russia) to make such a quest.

But the docking isn't the only historic marker for China. The three-person crew aboard the Shenzhou 9 consisted of China's first female astronaut, Liu Yang. The other two astronauts were Jing Haipeng and Liu Wang.

"I feel honored to fly into space on behalf of hundreds of millions of Chinese females," said Liu.

The Shenzhou 9 will remain docked at the Tiangong 1 until later this week, and then re-dock for another test in manual mode. The spacecraft is expected to be in orbit for 13 days.

The Tiangong 1 was launched into space in September 2011, and the unmanned Shenzhou 8 spacecraft linked up to it in November. Today's manned docking represented a whole new first for the country.

China described its five-year space plans in a report released by the government last December. According to the blueprint, the country wants to construct space stations, ship freighters, space laboratories and a manned spaceship through the end of 2016.
China also said it plans to use probes to explore the moon's surface as well as asteroids, planets and the sun, and it wants to improve launch vehicles, meteorological
satellites, communications and broadcasting to form a global satellite navigation system.

Source: Space.com



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: It's about time.
By JediJeb on 6/20/2012 5:44:01 PM , Rating: 2
Sometimes I wonder about that. It would make sense to think that everyone working together as a group would be more efficient, yet we usually see much faster gains when smaller groups are competing against each other.

Competition seems to bring out a raw ingenuity that working together in a co-op doesn't. Many times, when the responsibility can be spread out among many members we become lax in our achievements or we fall into the "pass it through committee" mind set where it takes forever for the group to come to a consensus as to how to proceed. The Chinese are a very competitive group, while here in the US we are teaching our children not to worry about competition because "everybody wins!"

I just wish this story would show up as headline news on all the outlets instead of just on tech sites such as this. While it is most appreciated by those of us who follow tech advancements, it will take the kick in the pants to the average person to finally get us going again in fields such as space exploration. When Sputnik launched it was on every TV and in every newspaper and on radio that the Russians had done it. Yet not a single person I work with even knew the Chinese had a space program and they are really shocked when I mention that India has one too.


RE: It's about time.
By Ammohunt on 6/25/2012 2:27:27 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
.....while here in the US we are teaching our children not to worry about competition because "everybody wins!"


Good job on this post! your trophy is in the mail!


"Nowadays you can buy a CPU cheaper than the CPU fan." -- Unnamed AMD executive














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki