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  (Source: immigrationlawchronicles.com)
Large technology companies in particular like Microsoft and Autodesk are pushing Congress to up the number of H-1B visas available each year

The U.S. government announced this week that work permits in the H-1B visa program are almost entirely depleted for 2013.

According to the United States Immigration and Citizenship Services (USCIS), 55,600 standard H-1B visas have already been issued out of 65,000 for the next fiscal year. In addition, 18,700 H-1B visas for graduates of advanced degree programs were issued in the U.S. out of 20,000. These numbers were posted as of June 1, and USCIS started accepting applications on April 1.

This is a significant increase, considering it took until November to use up all of last year's work permits. It is believed that this is a sign of better economic times, and U.S. companies are pushing for an expansion of the H-1B program.

Large technology companies in particular like Microsoft and Autodesk are pushing Congress to up the number of H-1B visas available each year. This would allow them and other companies in the U.S. to import workers with skills in technology and finance.

According to a study from Partnership for A New American Economy, which is an industry lobby group, the U.S. will have a shortage of 224,000 tech workers by 2018 if more visas are not made available.

The 2013 fiscal year begins October 1, 2012.

Source: InformationWeek



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RE: Abuse
By Solandri on 6/13/2012 6:29:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Schools do not push, they lead or enable. If a student does not want to learn Newtonian physics then they will not learn it. You can force them to take the course, you can force them to take the test, but unless they want to learn, they won't.

You're assuming the only incentives are carrots. There are sticks as well. I'd agree with you that on the whole carrots are a better incentive. But what is the point of sparing the child from a stick in school, if it'll lead him to a lifetime of sticks in the form of low income jobs?

quote:
The real problem is kids do not want to learn. And why should they? The only people who become rich are actors, inventors, and drug dealers. All the other high paying professions outsource their development to foreign nations, or import foreign workers so they do not have to pay them what they are worth.

That more reflects your loss of faith in the country than it does reality. My extended family and myself are all immigrants (none on H-1Bs). Each family came to this country with only $1000 in our name (that was all our native country would let us take with us at the time). Since then, most of us have made upper-middle class lives for ourselves. Three people started and own million dollar companies. One started and owns a multi-million dollar chain of cell phone stores. The worst off lives in a trailer home, but makes do. Our parents stressed to us, and we stress to our kids, the importance of a good education, and living within our means (my early childhood was spent in low income housing).

The opportunity is there. In the case of K-12 education it's handed to you on a silver platter. You just have to reach out and grasp it. If you instead wallow in self-pity that others are taking it from you, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. The companies getting these H-1Bs didn't get them because they sat and whined about how there weren't enough skilled workers. They got them because they worked and lobbied for them. If you want to eliminate them, you have to work to succeed and lobby for to end them, not sit and whine about it.


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