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  (Source: immigrationlawchronicles.com)
Large technology companies in particular like Microsoft and Autodesk are pushing Congress to up the number of H-1B visas available each year

The U.S. government announced this week that work permits in the H-1B visa program are almost entirely depleted for 2013.

According to the United States Immigration and Citizenship Services (USCIS), 55,600 standard H-1B visas have already been issued out of 65,000 for the next fiscal year. In addition, 18,700 H-1B visas for graduates of advanced degree programs were issued in the U.S. out of 20,000. These numbers were posted as of June 1, and USCIS started accepting applications on April 1.

This is a significant increase, considering it took until November to use up all of last year's work permits. It is believed that this is a sign of better economic times, and U.S. companies are pushing for an expansion of the H-1B program.

Large technology companies in particular like Microsoft and Autodesk are pushing Congress to up the number of H-1B visas available each year. This would allow them and other companies in the U.S. to import workers with skills in technology and finance.

According to a study from Partnership for A New American Economy, which is an industry lobby group, the U.S. will have a shortage of 224,000 tech workers by 2018 if more visas are not made available.

The 2013 fiscal year begins October 1, 2012.

Source: InformationWeek



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RE: Abuse
By JediJeb on 6/12/2012 6:47:19 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Also, where are these unemployed developers? They're not in my little corner of the country. I've seen the same litany of tech job posts go unfilled here for years. Not exaggerating, either; YEARS. There's also companies like Siemens that've been reporting problem finding US grads in specific fields for years as well.


The reason we are in this shape is because we let our education system push students towards arts and entertainment instead of science and technology. We water down the curriculum until almost every student can pass with an A or B grade so that the school looks good on the books, yet the ones graduating from them can barely solve a simple cross word puzzle or count change at the store. We have one kid we recently hired who was told to check on his work at a quarter past three. He gave a blank stare and we had to tell him that meant 3:15. He had never heard the word quarter used in any fashion other than to describe a coin and did not know that fifteen minutes was 1/4 of an hour or even that a quarter was 1/4 of a dollar, only that it was 25 cents. Seriously, I learned these things when I was in the third grade! My sister who is a special ed teacher said that the school systems are not even telling regular ed teachers to have students learn their multiplication tables anymore, they would rather they learn to do math on a calculator. They worry more about if a student can get along with other students than if they can count, read, or just about any other thing necessary for survival in life. No wonder we have to look outside the US for technology jobs to be filled.

We need to go back to a time in our schools when failure was an option, and you paid the price for goofing off instead of studying. Listening to things teachers tell me today makes me wonder if in two generations from now the US will even have a population that know anything beyond being able to push a button are receive a prize.


RE: Abuse
By fic2 on 6/12/12, Rating: 0
RE: Abuse
By tecknurd on 6/12/12, Rating: 0
RE: Abuse
By nafhan on 6/13/2012 10:33:10 AM , Rating: 2
Parents are to blame for a lot of this, too.
Based on stuff teachers I know have said, "if a student can get along with other students" is MUCH more of a legitimate concern than it was in the past. Not disagreeing you, more trying to point out that fixing the education system isn't something that can necessarily be done by the education system, alone.


RE: Abuse
By JediJeb on 6/13/2012 11:21:57 AM , Rating: 2
Very true! Parents are part of the education system whether they want to be or not.


RE: Abuse
By MrBlastman on 6/13/2012 2:28:24 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
We need to go back to a time in our schools when failure was an option, and you paid the price for goofing off instead of studying. Listening to things teachers tell me today makes me wonder if in two generations from now the US will even have a population that know anything beyond being able to push a button are receive a prize.


The Government doesn't want this though. They want people to act like Oliver and hold out their hands in despair asking, "More, please" as we shovel slop onto their plates that is only rapidly scarfed down and empty once more.

The Government understands that if people are taught how to think, they can't be controlled. Thus, it would require too much effort to keep them dependent. It knows that if people learn how to overcome challenges, they won't grovel for help instead.

The Government does this for job security. If We the People realized (in their eyes) that we don't really need all the excessive fluff they (take) provide, none of this would be allowed to happen. Thus, our schools are dumbed down, the people's minds are allowed to atrophy and the spirit of our country is allowed to blow off into oblivion.

My wife is a teacher and I haven't heard of kids not learning their multiplication tables anymore. It could be that she's taught at private schools for years, not public ones. I'll have to ask her about that tonight.


RE: Abuse
By mellomonk on 6/13/2012 4:37:35 PM , Rating: 1
Wow. Just wow. The statement above, with all of it's fear, suspicion, and outright conspiracy theory wackiness is a poster for the failure of our education system. The fact that someone could be so media manipulated to have such an opinion of his own government is sad.

Free and skeptical thinking is great. But biased wacky reinterpretation is not thinking free. Wake up and read a civics book and get involved in the political process. Learn about the limits of government, implementation of policy, and checks & balances.


RE: Abuse
By 1prophet on 6/14/2012 12:45:43 PM , Rating: 2
Instead of government how about owners?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acLW1vFO-2Q


RE: Abuse
By Ringold on 6/14/2012 5:35:13 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Learn about the limits of government, implementation of policy, and checks & balances.


You'd be 100% correct if the constitution was respected, but we ignore it and its intent every day. Between the interstate commerce clause's abuse and the EPA's being allowed to regulate CO2, the government has given itself a blank check to regulate every aspect of our lives at the federal level, and then we've got local politicians like Bloomberg that want to tell us what to eat, how much, etc., or Obama dictating free birth control for one segment of the population at the expense of all others, etc. Then look at the recess appointments he's made, bypassing the Senate's constitutional job of vetting various appointments. Bush did it on a temporary basis, but it's a whole new level now.

So, asides from the occasional circus of elections where most people vote the same way year after year, I do not see any of this "checks & balances" stuff you speak of. I mean, I see it in the constitution, but where is the check and balance with Eric Holder appointing a campaign contributor and long time personal friend to investigate his own misdeeds?

Tl;dr: Wake up.


RE: Abuse
By Trisped on 6/13/2012 5:23:17 PM , Rating: 2
Wow, your ignorance is appalling.

The phrase "A quarter past three" went out of style with the advent of the digital clock. We no longer have to estimate time due to the limitations of the analog clock, as such we say exactly what we mean, if we mean 3:10, 3:15, or 3:20 we just say it. Have you ever heard someone say "A sixth past three." or "A third past three."? then why do you insist that the new generation be required to understand your archaic and inaccurate way of communicating time?

While I agree it is important to teach kids the multiplication tables, this is not the 1970s where calculators are expensive with limited functionality, calculators are everywhere. You can find them on your computer, your phone, your tablet, you can buy them for $5 in most stores, or get which can do more them your advanced calculus teacher. So yes, I think it is important to teach kids to memorize the basic 0-10 multiplication tables, but they will probably never use it. Instead they will depend on the higher accuracy and faster calculator.


RE: Abuse
By Solandri on 6/13/2012 6:07:09 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
The phrase "A quarter past three" went out of style with the advent of the digital clock. We no longer have to estimate time due to the limitations of the analog clock, as such we say exactly what we mean, if we mean 3:10, 3:15, or 3:20 we just say it.

The phrase "a quarter past three" is actually conveying two pieces of information. A time and a range. If you want to meet at exactly 3:15, you say 3:15. If you want to meet at about 3:15, you say a quarter past three. That specifies a timeframe of about 3:10-3:20 for most people. It's basically a short way of saying, "3:15, give or take x minutes".

This is a big problem I see in younger people, probably because of the reason you cited - the advent of digital clocks. One of the engineers at a previous job was tasked with making sure a ship we were building stayed within the design weight. He had a huge spreadsheet with the weight of every layer of fiberglass, every can of epoxy, every piece of equipment, every nut and bolt. I was actually impressed with how thorough he had been. But he had no error margins. He could tell you exactly how much he thought the ship weighed, but he had absolutely no clue how accurate his total was. Was it off by a few grams? A few kg? A few tons? No idea. We couldn't make an accurate prediction of how fast the ship would go when selecting an engine. We had to wait until it was actually in the water with engines installed.

quote:
While I agree it is important to teach kids the multiplication tables, this is not the 1970s where calculators are expensive with limited functionality, calculators are everywhere. You can find them on your computer, your phone, your tablet, you can buy them for $5 in most stores, or get which can do more them your advanced calculus teacher. So yes, I think it is important to teach kids to memorize the basic 0-10 multiplication tables, but they will probably never use it.

Learning the multiplication table isn't about being able to give quick answers to multiplication questions or exact change in a store. It's about gaining insight into numbers and proportions. If you have the table memorized, you know intuitively whether 4 groups of 8 is bigger or smaller than 5 groups of 6. Estimation becomes more accurate, and everyone uses estimates even if they hated math. It's why when someone makes a post about powering something with solar panels, I can usually tell at a glance whether he's in the right ballpark or seriously off, before I do any exact calculations.


RE: Abuse
By Ringold on 6/14/2012 5:39:20 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's why when someone makes a post about powering something with solar panels, I can usually tell at a glance whether he's in the right ballpark or seriously off, before I do any exact calculations.


Yes! A thousand times yes. Back in college some times peers would think I was some sort of math savant, being able to glance at their work and point out the huge problems immediately. No, in fact I'm pretty bad and don't enjoy math at all, but I bothered to understand it, so it's not hard to have a feel for where an equation should be going or where a final answer should be before working out the math. That's, apparently, not an easy thing for kids to do any more, and I have to believe it seriously would crimp their productivity at any math or engineering related job, where they have more errors to go back and correct later because they're too ignorant to catch them on the fly versus better educated peers.


RE: Abuse
By Trisped on 6/13/2012 5:33:02 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The reason we are in this shape is because we let our education system push students towards arts and entertainment instead of science and technology.
Schools do not push, they lead or enable. If a student does not want to learn Newtonian physics then they will not learn it. You can force them to take the course, you can force them to take the test, but unless they want to learn, they won't.

The real problem is kids do not want to learn. And why should they? The only people who become rich are actors, inventors, and drug dealers. All the other high paying professions outsource their development to foreign nations, or import foreign workers so they do not have to pay them what they are worth. If more companies were willing to pay more for technical workers, more people would pursue those careers. The additional people pursuing the careers would allow more competition and separation of those who know the field vs those who do not.


RE: Abuse
By Solandri on 6/13/2012 6:29:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Schools do not push, they lead or enable. If a student does not want to learn Newtonian physics then they will not learn it. You can force them to take the course, you can force them to take the test, but unless they want to learn, they won't.

You're assuming the only incentives are carrots. There are sticks as well. I'd agree with you that on the whole carrots are a better incentive. But what is the point of sparing the child from a stick in school, if it'll lead him to a lifetime of sticks in the form of low income jobs?

quote:
The real problem is kids do not want to learn. And why should they? The only people who become rich are actors, inventors, and drug dealers. All the other high paying professions outsource their development to foreign nations, or import foreign workers so they do not have to pay them what they are worth.

That more reflects your loss of faith in the country than it does reality. My extended family and myself are all immigrants (none on H-1Bs). Each family came to this country with only $1000 in our name (that was all our native country would let us take with us at the time). Since then, most of us have made upper-middle class lives for ourselves. Three people started and own million dollar companies. One started and owns a multi-million dollar chain of cell phone stores. The worst off lives in a trailer home, but makes do. Our parents stressed to us, and we stress to our kids, the importance of a good education, and living within our means (my early childhood was spent in low income housing).

The opportunity is there. In the case of K-12 education it's handed to you on a silver platter. You just have to reach out and grasp it. If you instead wallow in self-pity that others are taking it from you, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. The companies getting these H-1Bs didn't get them because they sat and whined about how there weren't enough skilled workers. They got them because they worked and lobbied for them. If you want to eliminate them, you have to work to succeed and lobby for to end them, not sit and whine about it.


RE: Abuse
By Mint on 6/13/2012 7:02:37 PM , Rating: 2
I can't believe you got rated to a 5 for this worthless theory.

The education system is pushing people towards arts instead of technology? WTF? I bet 80% of highschool grads learn more algebra than they'll ever use in their life, so they're pushing people there as much as they can. Who on earth would choose an arts degree instead of a tech career? Earning potential is WAY higher with the latter. If you enjoy math/science and are good at it, you'd have to be an ignoramus to pursue arts as a career.

FYI, arithmetic has almost nothing to do with the math skills needed in technology, and I can only assume that you're not an engineer, scientist, or programmer. If anything, we should have more calculators in school, forcing curriculums to come up with more creative problems to solve.

If you want to blame something for luring kids away from science and engineering, blame American society for the allure of chasing liberal arts tail...


"Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day, they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally. I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine." -- Bill Gates

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