backtop


Print 25 comment(s) - last by Solandri.. on May 31 at 3:21 PM


  (Source: Verizon)
Pricing for all of the tiers will be announced next month, where Verizon users can choose a standalone Internet service or add these tiers to their bundles

Verizon announced today that it will not only more than double the speeds of many FiOS Internet tiers, but will also add two new tiers.

According to Verizon, its updated FiOS Internet tiers will consist of 50/25 Mbps and 150/65 download/upload speeds. However, other entry-level options will remain the same, such as the 15/5 Mbps, 25/25 Mbps, 35/35 Mbps, 50/20 Mbps and 150/35 Mbps tiers.

The two new tiers will feature 75/35 Mbps or 300/65 Mbps speeds. Verizon said the 300/65 tier is double that of the current FiOS Internet top speed, which is 150/35 Mbps.

"The ways we used the Internet and watched TV over the past 10 to 15 years have dramatically shifted," said Bob Mudge, president of Verizon's consumer and mass market business unit. "With the emergence of smartphones, smart TVs, Blu-ray players, tablets and gaming consoles that also serve as over-the-top devices, consumers need more bandwidth to receive the highest quality experience."

Each tier is targeted at a specific audience. The layout is as follows: 15/5 Mbps for a one or two person household for just email and Web browsing; 50/25 Mbps for a multi-person household that downloads music, watches videos and telecommutes; 75/35 Mbps for households that have three or more people on Internet-connected devices, stream HD movies, and play multi-player gaming, and 150/65 and 300/65 for households with five or more heavy Internet users.

"Our top FiOS speed will be twice as fast as anything America has ever seen," said Mike Ritter, chief marketing officer for Verizon's consumer and mass market business unit. "High-speed Internet no longer is just for techies, as more than half of our residential consumers already use at least a 20 Mbps Internet connection. Streaming online video on an all-fiber-optic connection providing faster speeds is better and more reliable during peak Internet usage hours.

"As recently as 2005, video was less than 10 percent of Web traffic. By the end of this year, we expect it to be 50 percent, growing to 90 percent in just a few years."

The 150/65 and 300/65 tiers will require a gigabit passive optical network (GPON) installation.

Pricing for all of the tiers will be announced next month, where Verizon users can choose a standalone Internet service or add these tiers to their bundles.

Source: Verizon



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: That's great!
By Alexvrb on 5/30/2012 10:30:51 PM , Rating: 3
Right, cause all they have to do is dig holes and shove fiber in it. Don't have to have permission or anything. It's not like in some prime markets they've had to negotiate back and forth endlessly with greedy and corrupt local officials... oh wait.

I've got it in my area, if I lived someplace that had politicians that prevented FiOS from coming in I'd be pissed. Doesn't matter whether they're taking bribes from cable companies or trying to extract as much money from Verizon as possible, either way it's a shame. I guess its too late now, Verizon doesn't seem to be eager to get back into those kinds of battles at the moment.


RE: That's great!
By johnsmith9875 on 5/31/2012 10:13:43 AM , Rating: 2
I think your anger is misguided....who exactly is pulling the strings behind those "corrupt" politicians?

Let's see, its another private industry competing with Verizon's FIOS.

This is just a turf war, just like when AT&T sues any municipality attempting to set up their own DSL service.


RE: That's great!
By Reclaimer77 on 5/31/2012 10:13:34 AM , Rating: 2
You might want to look up "municipal monopolies" and you'll see why he said that.

These aren't natural home-grown monopolies. They are locally sanctioned.


RE: That's great!
By Solandri on 5/31/2012 3:01:22 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
I think your anger is misguided....who exactly is pulling the strings behind those "corrupt" politicians?

Let's see, its another private industry competing with Verizon's FIOS.

In my city's case, according to the local newspaper it was the city politicians themselves. The city was one of Verizon's first cities to get FIOS after the initial testing phase. Then rollout mysteriously stopped for nearly 5 years (a few blocks away from my house, aggravatingly enough). It picked up again a couple years ago, so I have FIOS now.

According to the newspaper, the politicians initially negotiated with Verizon on a per-house fee for running FIOS (paid to the city for access to the underground easements where they run the fiber). Then they realized it was insanely popular (about 10x faster than cable internet at the time) and Verizon would be making money hand over fist, so they then tried to charge Verizon a much higher per-house fee for remaining houses. Verizon said screw it and stopped the rollout. Presumably, a couple years ago Verizon and the city politicians were able to agree upon an amicable fee schedule.

IMHO this is no better than ISPs thwarting network neutrality. If you subscribe to an ISP, you are paying them to provide you with service, not to hold you hostage so they can auction you off to websites which are willing to pay. Likewise, you're paying the city taxes to smooth the way for the best utility services which can be obtained. Not for them to hold you hostage so they can auction you off to the highest-bidding utility company.


"Game reviewers fought each other to write the most glowing coverage possible for the powerhouse Sony, MS systems. Reviewers flipped coins to see who would review the Nintendo Wii. The losers got stuck with the job." -- Andy Marken














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki