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High-end Tesla Model S could be the most efficient EV in the land

Tesla is set to put its Model S all-electric sedan on the market a few months ahead of schedule, with the first customer deliveries taking place next month. Another bit of good news for Tesla and the people who are waiting for their Model S to take up residence in their driveway has surfaced. 
 
Motor Trend reports that the top-of-the-line (85 kWh) Model S is expected to earn a window sticker rating from the EPA showing a 265-mile driving range.
 
There has been confusion on the driving range for a fully charged Model S, mostly because multiple numbers have been thrown around since the vehicle was first unveiled. The driving range has been at different times said to be 160-miles, 230-miles, and 300-miles depending upon the size of the battery pack installed. Tesla also recently noted that the car was able to achieve a 320-mile driving range on a full charge in the EPA's 2-cycle driving test.
 
The new 265-mile range for the window sticker is based on the EPA's new five-cycle test. If Tesla is able to land that 265-mile driving range on the EPA's new test, the Model S will be massively superior to other electric vehicles, such as the Nissan Leaf, which was only able to muster a 73-mile driving range on the same test. Granted, the high-end Model S is much more expensive than the Leaf.
 
The real world driving distance will likely vary significantly, depending on where the vehicle is operated and how heavy the driver's right foot is.
 
The Model S is also available with smaller 40 kWh or 60 kWh battery packs. The base Model S will sell for $57,400 and range up to $105,400 for higher end versions with an 85 kWh lithium-ion battery. Tesla has 10,000 orders in hand for the new Model S EV.
 
Word that the car may come early sent shares of Tesla stock surging.

Source: MotorTrend



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RE: Almost there...
By CharonPDX on 5/16/2012 4:06:38 PM , Rating: 2
You do it with gas now.

Obviously we need truly ubiquitous charging stations, and for ultra-fast charging to be the standard before EVs can truly start to replace gas cars, though. If you work somewhere that has their own parking lot, and they have *ANY* type of "community involvement" or "awareness" teams, bring it up. Tell them you're interested in an EV, but would need a charger at work. Many employers will do it.

As it is, a Level 3 charger can charge you up to drive at least 50 miles in 10 minutes. About the same amount of time spent at a standard gas station when they're busy.


RE: Almost there...
By lelias2k on 5/16/2012 4:39:47 PM , Rating: 2
Plus some states give the business subsidies to install the chargers and you end up with a "private" parking space. :)


RE: Almost there...
By sigmatau on 5/16/2012 5:07:44 PM , Rating: 2
LOL!!!!!!!!!!!

I feel insane even replying to this crap. So you spend 10 minutes pumping 2 gallons of gas?


RE: Almost there...
By mindless1 on 5/17/2012 12:45:52 PM , Rating: 2
BS. If you can go 50 miles after 10 minutes of charge time, that's 80 minutes charging to drive a typical ~400 mile ICE car range but not just 8X as long, you also have the time spent to drive to and from this charging station as it's bound to be slightly out of the way - we're not reserving abandoned lots along prime travel routes to be able to place them there and such locations would be costly property, would have to charge quite a bit more than the cost of the electricity (several times more), diminishing the savings EV owners thought they'd reap by not buying gas. If a charging station has to charge a vehicle 8X as long, they'll be able to service 1/8th as many customers and need to have 8X the profit per customer compared to a gas station's fuel profits.

It has not taken me over 5 minutes to fill my gas tank for years.

Employers that have community involvement and awareness teams have them to create the impression that they care, not to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars outfitting a parking lot to suit a few people who are early EV adopters. The majority of employers will not do it until a large % of employees drive the vehicles, or when they maintain a fleet that they convert to EV vehicles at the next replacement turnover.


"Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day, they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally. I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine." -- Bill Gates














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