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Apple's new Maps app  (Source: 9 to 5 Mac)
Apple is expected to show off the new Maps app at the company's World Wide Developers Conference in June

Apple is reportedly ditching Google for its Maps application once iOS 6 comes around.

Since 2007, Apple's Maps app has used a Google backend. This means that Apple has had full control of the application design, but Google owned the backend. The iPhone, iPad and iPod touch have all been running Google Maps since each device's launch.

But this is all about to change, according to 9 to 5 Mac. Apple is now looking to launch an all new Maps application with an Apple backend that is reportedly faster and more reliable than Google Maps.

The decision to go solo was based on Apple's acquisition of Placebase, an online mapping service with special customizations and features; C3 Technologies, which provides detailed 3D city models for the web mapping industry, and Poly9, a Canadian company that creates interactive 3D software designed for use in a browser.

With these new mapping services in Apple's back pocket, the tech giant is ready to launch a whole new application once iOS 6 debuts. The app will have a new logo, but more importantly, it will offer 3D mode for a stunning view of any location the user chooses. The 3D mode feature was built by C3 Technologies.

Users can choose 3D mode much like they currently select pin, traffic and map buttons: just by pushing a new "3D" button. Once doing so, the user will receive realistic images right on their iPhone, iPad or iPod touch.

Many expect Apple to show off the new Maps app at the company's World Wide Developers Conference in June.

Source: 9 to 5 Mac



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RE: A dish served cold
By Tony Swash on 5/11/2012 6:54:31 PM , Rating: -1
You faith in the government is touching.

Anti-trust laws are used against attempts to distort the market through a combination of monopoly share and the use of that monopoly share to erect barriers to others entering or operating in the market. Other than music players (yesterday's market), and tablets, Apple doesn't have a monopoly share in any market. It's share of the tablet market is likely to remain very high but nothing Apple is doing in the tablet market precludes anybody else competing fairly in that market.

The tax issue is a red herring. Apple's tax practices are similar to all other companies of a comparable size. There has been zero evidence that this will attract legal action. I repeat - I cannot see what force can stop Apple reaching a billion users in a couple or so years and Apple are pretty much the only company other than Samsung that is making money out of the mobile device market.

Here is Brain Hall again - punchy as ever:

quote:
Business Insider estimates that mobile advertising -- in 2017 -- will total less than $6 billion. Their focus is on the massive US market. Let's throw in the world and double that $6 billion to $12 billion.

Now let's agree that their estimate is conservative. Boost it to $20 billion.

Meaning, the entire global mobile advertising business will be *half* of just Google's 2012 revenues. And they will not capture all of these. Apple and iAds will capture their slice, as will Microsoft Bing. Some will go to companies like Foursquare and Twitter, or their progeny. Others will get a piece.

But here's what the analysts continue to miss and which I continue to harp on: the mobile advertising business is **not** incremental. It is not supplemental. It is a **replacement**.

More and more of what we do, what we search for, what we read, play, map, watch, surf, buy and sell takes place on the smartphone. It is where we connect with people, places and data.

Not the desktop.

Analysts -- and investors -- need to understand that desktop advertising revenues will not simply continue as mobile grows. Those desktop ad dollars are based on activity that will cease and/or transfer to the smartphone.

There is a very real chance that Google, for example, a digital advertising company, can do everything right yet find itself with a radically smaller market five years from now.


RE: A dish served cold
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/11/2012 7:59:41 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
but nothing Apple is doing in the tablet market precludes anybody else competing fairly in that market.
Except....SUING them for making something they PERCEIVE is copying. I swear, you are so blind to reality it's not even close to being funny anymore.


RE: A dish served cold
By Tony Swash on 5/12/12, Rating: -1
RE: A dish served cold
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/12/2012 10:15:05 AM , Rating: 2
Apple shill to the rescue with a another book of a post....


RE: A dish served cold
By Tony Swash on 5/12/12, Rating: -1
RE: A dish served cold
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/14/12, Rating: 0
RE: A dish served cold
By messele on 5/13/12, Rating: 0
RE: A dish served cold
By Cheesew1z69 on 5/13/2012 5:38:28 PM , Rating: 2
Except what you say, isn't really saying much. Also, you think your petty childish insults is doing something? Not really.


RE: A dish served cold
By Pirks on 5/14/2012 12:30:45 PM , Rating: 2
Nice work clown, I like your funny posts too, post some more one liner BS please :)


RE: A dish served cold
By drycrust3 on 5/11/2012 9:21:23 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I cannot see what force can stop Apple reaching a billion users in a couple or so years

Technologically, the time is right for more than 1 billion smartphones. The problem isn't the technical limitations, the problem is the world isn't ready for a "Apple with 1 billion 'locked into Apple's system' users".
When you consider the problems Microsoft had with trying to sell Windows whatever with just IE x on it, then you can see that ahead of Apple are even a bigger problems. They supply the hardware, the software, control the apps, and decide which networks will carry their products, each of which puts Apple in the position of being "the Microsoft" in the respective "browser war", e.g. "Why should Microsoft have to allow Firefox and Opera and Chrome on their OS, but Apple won't allow Acer and Asus and HP and Lenovo include Apple's iOS software on their products?".


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